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Full text of "Yesterday and today : 250th anniversary, 1734-1984"

250th ^NNIVGRSARY 




Town of Halifax 




YESTERDAY & TODAY 



As with all publications of this kind, YESTERDAY & TODAY 
has been made possible by generous contributions of time and 
materials from more people, both in and out of Halifax, than 
can be mentioned here. It has been financed with the help of funds 
donated by: 

Abington Savings Bank 

Mutual Federal Savings & Loan 

Rockland Trust Company 

Members of the committee express their sincere thanks to all 
who have played a part in producing this book. 



INTRODUCTION 



In the spring of 1981 a committee was formed to make preparations for the 250th Anniversary 
for the town of Halifax. The celebration is to be held the week of July 4, 1984. The History 
Committee, a sub-committee of the larger Anniversary Committee, was established for the 
purpose of producing something tangible as a memento of that event and this commemorative 
booklet is the result. 

In a very real sense, the booklet is a treasure chest filled with bits and pieces of the town's first 
250 years. Fifty years from now, when the town celebrates its 300th birthday, those of us lucky 
enough to be around to finger through its pages will be able to experience a special pleasure in 
stopping now and then to say, "I remember when . . ." 

There are many pictures and documents here which will help make Halifax's first 250 years 
come alive for you. There is something of its industries, schools, churches, homes, and much more 
to stimulate memory, imagination, or both. In some cases pictures of places as they appear in 
town today are placed alongside pictures of the same places as they looked years ago. The 
differences are frequently surprising and, sometimes perhaps, even startling or unbelievable. 

There are those looking at this book who will be able to remember our 200th birthday party 
and the write-up of that occasion should be particularly meaningful for them. A brief history of 
the town will be of some help in filling in the "pictureless gaps" of our earliest days and, for those 
who may wish to know more, we recommend the History of Halifax, written by former town 
historian Guy S. Baker. Some of the pictures in this volume are from Guy's book. 

Although there is a great deal about buildings, places, and events in the pages which follow, this 
is really a book about people, for that is, after all, what buildings, places, and events are all about. 
So you may notice that wherever possible we have included pictures and/or information about 
Halifax residents responsible for or involved with those buildings, places, or events. 

Thanks go to all of those who responded to the committee's plea that attics and old trunks be 
searched for pictures which might be used in this book. Their response made many hours of work 
all the more enjoyable and gratifying for committee members. In the months we have worked 
together all of us, "natives" and otherwise, have shared many memories and not a single one of us 
can say that we learned nothing from the experience. We hope that fellow townspeople will enjoy 
the book as much as we have enjoyed putting it together. 

HISTORY COMMITTEE 

Ruth V. Perkins, Town Historian Roger J. Pelletier 

James W. H. Baker C. Otis Bosworth 

Harry H. Brown Jeannette F. Bosworth 

John F. Shea Dorene E. Kiernan 



Preface 

After looking through this book, it should be clear that Halifax harbors a rich and active past. 
There were years when the town was, without question, an area focal point for many activities 
and industries. 

Halifax was a focal point, for example, for those seeking rest and relaxation, as attested by still- 
vivid memories of weekend outings. Friends and relatives would arrive at the railroad station 
where they were picked up and transported by carriage to local homes, pondside cottages, or to 
the Hotel Monponsett whose pavilion is now nestled, cocoon-like, inside the restaurant which 
stands at the pond's edge. 

At other times of year the town was a focal point for communities which needed ice for homes 
and businesses. Teams of men were transported into town to cut ice from the pond and to store in 
large ice-houses that which was not to be shipped out for immediate use. Ruins of some of the 
large ice-houses, and those of smaller ones used by Halifax families, are still to be found around 
town, as are some of the old ice-cutting tools. The practice of ice-cutting and storing is among a 
number of lost arts once practiced in our town. 

Preparing charcoal was a process demanding skill and care which, in hindsight, might well 
justify its classification as an art. Men went into local forests to cut the wood, to stack, cover, and 
vent it just-so for the burning. And while the burning proceeded, the "coaler" built a temporary 
shelter beside the pit and lived on the spot to see that the burning continued evenly and at a 
proper pace. Once the coal was ready, the pit would be raked out and incompletely burned pieces 
piled into a smaller pit, known as the "fox," where it would be further burned to get every last bit 
of product from the valuable wood. Like the ice, charcoal was shipped to communities as far 
away as Boston. What is left of the coaling industry is to be found in woods which have grown up 
with many of the town's long-time residents. Scattered through the woods like fairy rings are 
relic pits, great and slightly mounded circles of dirt and vegetation. 

Although we look elsewhere for our herring today when the spring runs take place, there was a 
time when catching and selling the fish was big business in town. Rights to "catch and sell" were 
sold to individuals and competition for them was so great that the town eventually established a 
committee to oversee the whole business. Demand for the fish matched that for the right to "catch 
and sell" them. Indeed, it was so great at one time that a limit of 400 fish per customer was set 
until all who wished a supply had been provided for. The use of herring for family fare was wide- 
spread and recipes for dissolving the bones were highly valued. Former Town Historian, Guy S. 
Baker, remembered that of his mother: "clean them and soak them in a mixture of vinegar, 
brown sugar, and cinnamon." 

Speaking of food is a reminder that the business of seeing families housed, fed, and clothed was 
(and is) a most important one. It was the earliest, longest lasting, and foremost of all Halifax 
concerns. The few barns still standing around town might well be adopted as symbols of the small 
family farms that did so much to make survival possible. The few remaining chicken houses of 
size are reminders that as times changed some families outgrew the simple farm, grew and 
specialized, traded their products and services for the wherewithal to enrich their lives beyond 
what was possible by depending solely on what they could grow, build, or otherwise fabricate for 
themselves. Today the truck farms, the small orchards, the cranberry bogs, and the expansive 
fields of cow-corn and hay stand as remnants of a simple farming past adjusted to fit a more 
complex present. 

There is much of Halifax's history still to be dug out, organized, and entered into the formal 
record. At a Town Meeting on November 10, 1834, for example, in response to an article on the 
warrant, it was "voted to have the Centennial Celebration of the 4th of July last in town recorded 
in the Town Book." No such recording has ever been found. Was a time capsule buried during the 
200th Birthday in 1934, as rumored? If so, where was it buried? No one seems to know! 

There is little written in this book which is new. What is new is that for the first time an 
invaluable pictorial record has been brought together for all the people of Halifax. 



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The above is a'cJpy of the original handwritten document of the Incorporation of the Town 
This is in the Archives at the State House. This is the best copy that we were able to obtain. It 
can be read - the following page. 



INCORPORATION OF THE TOWN OF HALIFAX 



[1st. Sess.] 



Province Laws. — 1734-35. 

CHAPTER 9. 

AN ACT FOR ERECTING A NEW TOWN WITHIN THE COUNTY OF 
PL[y][I]MOUTH, BY THE NAME OF HALLIFAX. 



WHEREAS the lands situate on the northerly part 
of the north precinct in Plimpton, the northerly part 
of the east precinct in Middleborough, and the 
southerly part of the town of Pembrook[e], is 
competently filled with inhabitants, who are desirous 
to be set off a distinct and sep[a][e]rate town, and 
that they may be [be] vested with all the powers and 
privile[d]ges of a town, — 

Be it therefore enacted by His Excellency the 
Governour, Council and Representatives in General 
Court assembled, and by the authority of the same, 

[SECT. 1.] That all the lands lying on the 
northerly part of the north precinct in Plimpton, the 
northerly part of the east precinct in Middleborough, 
and the southerly part of the town of Pembrook[e], 
as hereafter bounded and described, be and hereby is 
set off and constituted a sep[a][e]rate township by 
the name of Hallifax. 

[SECT. 2.] The bounds of the said township to be 
as followeth; viz., beginning at a white-oak tree 
marked on four sides, standing on the bank of 
Bridg[e]water River, being the northwest corner 
bounds of a lot of land formerly belonging to Mr. 
Standish; thence the bounds in Middleborough, 
extending north, seventy-nine degrees east, seventy- 
four rods, to a red oak, marked on four sides, which 
is the north-east corner of said Standish's land; 
thence south, sixteen degrees east, about one 
hundred and ten rods, to a maple standing near 
Standish's house; thence north, twenty-two degrees 
east, two hundred and fifty rods, to a white oak 
marked on four sides; thence north, ten degrees east, 
one hundred and sixty-one rods, to a white oak, 
formerly marked, on the southerly side of Bridgwater 
road; thence north, twelve degr[ees] east, one 
hundred and one rod, to a stake standing in 
Bridgwater line, on the south side of Seatucket 
Brook, so called, it being a corner bounds between 
the town of P[l]impton and Pembrook; thence the 
bounds in Pembrook, extending north, twenty 
degrees east, by a range of marked trees in 
Bridg[e]water line, seven hundred and ninety-one 
rods, to a small ash tree, formerly marked "69, 70," 
standing in a narrow swamp, being the north-west 
corner bound of the sixty-ninth lot[t] in the Major's 
purchase; thence south, sixty-seven degrees and an 
half east, one hundred sixty-nine pole, to a white oak 
tree, marked "69, 70," standing in the cedar swamp 
range; thence south, about twenty-three degrees east, 
thro[ugh] the cedar swamp, about five hundred and 
twelve rods, to the mouth of Monponset Pond; from 
thence east, half a degree northerly, about six 
hundred seventy-one rods, to a white oak tree 
marked on four sides, standing by a corner of 
Jones's-River Pond, a little to the northward of a run 
of water; thence bounded by said pond until[l] it 
meets with a line extending from a large split rock in 
Turky Swamp, a little to the southward of the bridge, 



Preamble. 



A new town 
granted by the 
name of Halifax. 



Bounds of the 
town described. 



Proviso. 
17 Pick. 



344. 



Proviso. 



north, thirty degrees east, unto the said pond; thence 
extending in Plimpton, south, thirty degrees west, 
about four hundred and fifty rods, unto the aforesaid 
rock in Turky Swamp; from thence south, sixty-three 
degrees and an half west, three hundred ninety-four 
rod, to Adam's Rocks, so called, standing on the west 
side of a highway that leads from Mr. John 
Waterman's to Plimpton meeting-house; thence 
south, fifty-six degrees west, five hundred and ten 
rods, to Middleborough town line, forty rods south- 
eastward from Mr. Ebenezer Fuller's house; thence 
in said town line, south, thirty-three degrees and a 
quarter east, fifty rod[j]; from thence through 
Middleborough, extending south, fifty degrees west, 
two hundred rod; from thence north, fifty degrees 
and a half west, fifty rod, to a small swamp-birch 
standing on the west side of Raven Brook; and thence 
still north, fifty degrees and an half west, three 
hundred eighty-three rods, to [the] [a] brook at the 
upper corner of Ebenezer Cobb's land, and still on 
the same point or range, about two hundred and 
ninety rods, to Bridgwater River, below the mouth of 
Winnatuscet River; and from thence by said 
Bridgwater River, to the bounds first mentioned. 

[SECT. 3.] And that the inhabitants of the said 
land before bounded and described, be and hereby 
are vested with the powers, priviledges and 
immunities that the inhabitants of any of the towns 
within this province are or ought by law to be vested 
with. 

Provided, 

[SECT. 4.] The inhabitants of the said town of 
Hallifax, do within the space of two years from the 
publication of this act, settle a learned, orthodox 
minister, and provide for his honourable support 
among them; and likewise provide a schoolmaster to 
instruct their youth in reading and writing: only it is 
to be understood that the land of Doctor Polycarpus 
Loring, adjo[/][y]ning to his dwelling-house, and the 
lands, lying on the south-easterly side of the line, that 
the north precinct voted to the petitioners the 3rd [of] 
June, 1734, belong to Mess[rs]. Ebenezer Standish, 
Zechariah Standish, Zechariah Soul, JabezNewland, 
Ignatius Loring, Samuel Bryant, Joseph P[h]enn[e]y, 
Nathaniel Bryant, John Battles, and their families, 
dwelling within the bounds of the said township, 
shall still be and remain to the aforesaid town of 
Plympton. 

Provided, 

[SECT. 5.] Nothing in this act shall be construed 
or understood to excuse any of the inhabitants of the 
towns of Plimpton, Middleborough and Pembrook, 
petitioners respectively, from paying their propor- 
tionable parts to all former taxes, and also the 
province tax that shall be laid on the said towns for 
the current year. [Passed July 4; published July 6. 




First Census of the United States 

Heads of Families — Massachusetts 

PLYMOUTH COUNTY "1790" 



NAME OF HEAD 
OF FAMILY 



HALIFAX TOWN 

Loring, Levi 

Sturdevant, Simeon 

Harlow, Jonathan 

Holmes, Lothrop 

Bosworth, Ichabod 

Holmes, Solomon 

Bearse, Andrew 

Briggs, David 

Briggs, Benjamin 

Briggs, Barnabas 

Briggs, John 

Briggs, Samuel 

Fuller, Thomas 

Jones, Lydia 

Leach, John 

Bozworth, David 

Ripley, Perez 

White, Joel 

Hall, Jabez 

Sturdevant, Stafford 

Briggs, Revd. Ephm 

Briggs, Abigail 

Thayer, Isaac 

Soule, Jabez 

Watermon, Aaber 

Waterman, Eleazer 

Holmes, Ellis 

Waterman, Elisha 

Sturdevant, Barzilla 

Palmer, Joshua 

Palmer, Joshua, Jur 

Sturdevant, Caleb 

Loring, Ignatius 

Cushing, Noah 

Faxon, Elisha 

Tilson, Joseph 

Hatch, Walter 

Tilson, Ephraim 

Sears, Holmes 

Waterman, Isaac 

Waterman, Freeman 

Pratt, Consider 

Cartee, Benja 

Pool, John 

Dunbar, Hannah 

Hathaway, Josiah 

Thomson, Ebenezer, Esq. . 
Thomson, Ebenezer, 3d . . . 

Thomson, Reuben 

Thomson, Abel 

Sturdevant, Simeon, Jur . . 

Bosworth, John 

Bozworth, Benja 

Sturdevant, Seth 

Waterman, Wm 

Allen, Micah 

Thomson, Asa 

Lyon, Deborah 



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A. BOSWORTH circa 1780 



Carver Street 



NAME OF HEAD 
OF FAMILY 



HALIFAX TOWN 
Thomson, Zebadiah .... 

Thomson, Moses 

Thomson, Thos 

Dunbar, Janet 

Samson, Barnabas 

Thomson, Ichabod 

Thomson, Adam 

Inglee, Moses 

Soule, Gideon 

Standish, Rebeccah 

Ryder, Nathl 

Bozworth, Selah 

Bozworth, Sarah 

Bozworth, Richard 

Thomson, Thaddeus .... 

Lamson, Nathan 

Fuller, Samuel 

Forrest, John 

Forrest, Asa 

Thomson, Jerusha 

Lyon, Obadiah 

Thomson, Peter 

Whitten, Abraham 

Whitten, Abraham, Jur . 

Tinkam, Ephm 

Waterman, John 

Sturdevant, Jabez 

Heyford, John 

Hathaway, Ebenezer. . . . 
Tilson, Ephm, Junr .... 

Cushing, Benja 

Tilson, John 

Donham, Wm 

Tilson, Wm 

Munroe, Henry 

Munroe, Benja 

Parish, Dan 

Leach, Silvanus 

Howland, Ichabod 

Thomson, Jacob 

Thomson, Ebenezer, Jur 

Thomson, Nathl 

Thomson, Levi 

Thomson, Ezra 

Thomson, Peter, Jur. . . . 

Thomas, Noah 

Gilbart, Benja 

Tinkham, Nathan 

Holmes, Oliver 

Tinkham, Joseph 

Wood, Timothy 

Wood, Hannah 

Wood, Judah 

Bozworth, Waterman . . . 

Lucas, Samuel 

Hartwell, Nathan 

Thomson, Noah 

Fuller, Ephraim 

Porter, Jonathan 

Brown, Samuel 

Fuller, Samuel 

Fuller, Eliza 

Fuller, Chipman 

Bozworth, James 

Thomson, Hulde 

Thomson, Amasa 



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TIMOTHY WOOD circa 1740 



River Street 




J. TILLSON 



circa 1750 



Elm Street 




R. STANDISH 



circa 1730 



VOTING LIST — 1818 



Eligible Voters for Governor, Lieutenant Governor and Councillors 
as prepared by the Board of Assessors - February 27, 1818 




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MAP OF HALIFAX — 1795 



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MAP OF HALIFAX — 1871 




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MAP OF HALIFAX — 1879 



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ALL ROADS LEAD TO HALIFAX 



ROUTES 




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No. 2 Road between the lakes, just before White Island 



No. 3 Looking Back (The Cove, East Lake) 





No. 4 Leaving White's Island 



No. 5 From West Lake looking toward White's Island 
and East Lake beyond road. 



A RIDE 

THROUGH 

THE 

LAKES 




No. 6 Across the street from Hotel Monponsett in earlier 
years. Sergio's today. 



No. 8 In earlier years, first old house on left after boat 
landing and beach. 



No. 7 Holmes Street, near East Lake, on the left about 
one quarter of a mile down Route 36 from Route 106. 




r OLD ROADS AND SCENES 








Looking west from Richmond Park area on Plymouth Street in the 1890's toward 
Old Colony greenhouses. A winter scene on Route 106. 

The same area in the spring 



'mud season. 




18. 



OLD ROADS AND SCENES 




Plymouth Street looking east toward the entrance to the present day golf club which is beyond 
the house on the right. 

Plymouth Street looking east from the Elementary School ballfield entrance. 




19 




This is South Street looking east as you approach Plymouth Street at the Town Hall. It looks 
across the fields behind Pope's Tavern toward the Standish Manor School, the present site of the 
Elementary School. 




River Street with railing of "three bridges" showing on left. 




River Street — the Three Bridges over the Winnetuxett River, Halifax, Massachusetts 



20 




Plymouth Street looking east from the Central School 
Right: Building in foreground (built by G. A. Estes) served as Post Office and Store; library second 
building; Pope's Tavern can be seen on top of hill. Left: Fire Station (now Historical Society 
building); Brockton Store and the Congregational Church beyond that. Telephone wires, no 
electricity. 




Shown here is the stone crusher used during the building of Plymouth Street from a dirt road to a 
hard-packed gravel road and eventually tar. This was in an open field diagonally across from the 
present site of our Post Office. The gravel road was started in 1901 at the Plympton line on 
Plymouth Street and was worked on, piece by piece, to Furnace Street through 1914. 




Left to right: Library, Estes Store, Central School, home - - after electricity. 



21 




Looking west to the top of the hill and 
the Civil War and Soldier's Monu- 
ments in the early 1900's. 



Below from left to right: the site of the 
Library/Post Office, former school 
building; Lysander Hayward residence 
with windmill; site of Fire Department, 
a former school building with Town jail 
under main building; and the Brockton 
Store in the early 1900's. 



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BEFORE THE CATHOLIC CHURCH 




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MONPONSETT STREET just before 1920. The tall building in the back left was Dr. Klein's 
Sanatorium (caring for eye diseases). The bell tower was five stories high and the building 
stood just behind where the Catholic Church now stands. 

The house on the left was owned by the Sanford family and the building behind it was 
used as a business by Densiger Bros., European makers of light sockets. 

The picture, lower right, shows the other side of the house and buildings (now the church 
parking lot) and was taken from the bell tower of the Sanatorium. The fire bell in the tower 
was installed in the Catholic Church when it was built. 



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Northern view 



Bird's-eye view of West Lake, Monponsett, Mass. 




Monponsett Street looking south. The building to the left is the old Boston Store and the 
house across the street was the Cephas White house that was removed. This is where Ocean 
Avenue was located when the street was straightened. 



,23 



OUR LADY OF THE LAKE CHURCH 




It was in 1920 that Reverend Patrick N, Walsh 
became the pastor of the Hanover parish and 
started a new era in the Catholic Church in 
Hanson. He decided to live at the Hotel Monpon- 
sett and to commute to Hanover. 

On March 12, 1921, Father Walsh purchased a 
large tract of land opposite West Lake in 
Monponsett from Mrs. Caroline Sanford. On the 
site a Dr. Klein had a sanitorium caring for eye 
diseases. 

On the present parking lot the large colonial 
farm house owned by Mr. Sanford was also bought 
by Father Walsh and the building remained for 
several years before being torn down. 

A mission-styled church was designed by Mr. 
Charles Norton of Boston and built by the Harlow 
Brothers of Middleboro in 1922 and dedicated to 
Our Lady of the Lake. It was built much as it looks 
today. During the winter months the main church 
was closed off and the right chapel side was used. 
Mr. Charles Ferry and Mr. Robert Andrews would 
put up large partitions to close off the main church. 

The first sexton was Mr. Jim Mclnty, who lived 
in the basement of the church. 

The first baptism in the new church was that of 
William Joseph Duffy, son of William and 
Catherine Duffy of Monponsett Street. 

The first altar boy was William Kelley, Jr., who 
had been given instructions by Father Walsh. 

During the four years that Father Walsh was 
pastor of the Hanson parish, he organized the 
limited Hanson congregation of winter and 
summer residents to work for their own mission. In 
June of 1924, Father McCormack had the grounds 



landscaped by George and Ernest Sturtevant of 
Halifax. He had church pews built to replace the 
original settees. 

During the pastorship of Father Houston, 
Natalie Silvestri, a promising music student of 13, 
became the first resident organist. An organ which 
was pumped by foot pedals was donated to the 
Monponsett Church by Mrs. Mary Spillane. With 
Natalie's younger sisters, Angeline and Victoria, 
the first choir was established. 

In 1937 Father Maguire purchased a large house 
across the street from the Monponsett Church 
from Louis and Louise Schindler Walsh to serve as 
a rectory. 

On March 12, 1957 Father Wallace came to Our 
Lady of the Lake as administrator. He revitalized 
every phase of the religious life of the parish. The 
church structure and grounds were improved. In 
May 1958 a shrine to Our Lady was given by the 
family of John Dias, Jr. who at 16 met accidental 
death. The rail was given by the family of the late 
Dexter Dearing. 




24 



CHURCHES 




Trunk Meeting House — 1853-1913 

The Trunk Meeting House got its name from the 
ceiling that "rounded like the lid of an old-fashioned 
steamer trunk." 

April 16, 1825 a petition was made to Justice of Peace 
Obediah Lyon to appoint someone to call a meeting to 
organize a church society of the Baptist faith. Nathan 
Perkins was appointed to call the meeting. The signers of 
the petition were from Middleboro, Plympton and 
Halifax. 

The church was located in South Halifax and stood on 
the corner of Fuller, Wood and Cedar Streets. It was 
dedicated on March 2, 1853. It served the people a good 
many years, and prior to its being burned on July 3, 1913, 
it had been deserted for several years and was in bad need 
of repair. 

The bell that was in the church was used in several 
locations in barns to serve as a fire bell until the phone 
lines were installed. The bell had disappeared for years. It 
was discovered in the barn of the Trop house on Wood 
Street in 1979. The bell now is in the possession of the 
Historical Society. 



I 





Ml 



The Universalist Church was located near 
the present home at 679 Plymouth Street. It 
was built in 1828. The building was sold in 
1893 to H. M. Bosworth who moved it to 
712 Old Plymouth Street. In 1950 the 
building was torn down and the present 
garage was erected. 





25 



CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 



The Congregational Church played an important part in 
the incorporation of the Town of Halifax (originally spelled 
Hallifax). Without a church, there could be no town. 
Churches were the focal points of their communities where 
the town's business was carried on and the religious services 
held. They were known then as "Meeting Houses." 

Although a group of people had permission to hold 
church services among themselves starting in 1732, it was 
not until 1734 that the church was built and the town 
incorporated. On April 9, 1732 a deed was signed by one 
John Bryant granting a piece of land on which the first 
Meeting House was erected. It was not until October 1734 
that a church was "officially" formed by the Ecclesiastical 
Council and the Covenant signed by "22 males and 31 
females" from the towns of Plympton, Middleboro and a 
few from Pembroke. The congregation was served for 20 
years by its first pastor, The Reverend John Cotton, who left 
only when a throat ailment forced his retirement from the 
ministry. 

In 1752 the Meeting House was too small to accom- 
modate the congregation and alterations were called for. In 
1821 money from the sale of pew space made it 
possible to give the first Meeting House its steeple 
and church bell. 

In 1851 the Meeting House was sold to the town 
for $700 and moved to the site of the present Town 
Hall where it served in that capacity until it was 
destroyed by fire in 1907. 

The present church building was placed on a 
spot a bit west of that occupied by the original 
building. It was erected at a cost of $5,200 and was 
dedicated on December 7, 1852 with a dedicatory 
sermon delivered by the Reverend Charles Porter 
from Plymouth. The Fellowship Hall was added in 
1966 and the mortgage was finally burned during a 
special service held at the church on April 9, 1978. 





On Sunday morning, December 18, 1921, a 
heavy gale of wind tore the steeple off its 
foundation, raised it in the air, turned it 
completely over and sent it crashing point 
downward through the roof, disappearing 
entirely. The Ladies Sewing Circle had raised 
several hundred dollars the previous summer 
to put the steeple in repair. 





Early in 1933, a definite effort was made to put the Church building in a good state of repair for by this 
time there was a need of complete overhauling. The approaching Bi-Centennial of the Church and Town 
served as an inspiration and the response by the members, townspeople and friends was hearty. This work 
was completed only a few days before the Anniversary program in 1934. On December 3, 1933, the interior 
having been practically completed, a service of re-dedication was held. 



26. 



CENTER OF TOWN 



The Congregational Church in the 
early 1900's with carriage sheds in 
the back between the Town Hall 
and the Church. The church was 
built in 1852 on this site. In 
foreground are the town scales, 
known as the "Hay Scales." 




!>J 




View of the Church and old Town 
Hall around 1906 with Civil War 
Monument in foreground with iron 
fence around it and carriage sheds 
behind Church. 



The carriage sheds 
looking west from 
the Town Hall about 
1905 with the Cen- 
tral School in the 
background. Notice 
the sawing demon- 
stration going on 
behind the church. 
The portable wood 
saw of R. Dewhurst 
was given the name, 
"Woodmobile." 




CENTER OF TOWN 




The original meeting house, from 
1733 to 1852, as drawn by 
Edmund Churchill from a verbal 
description given to him by his 
father. The building was later cut 
in half and enlarged. The meet- 
ing house served as a church and 
"Meetin Hall." A steeple was 
added in 1821. 



In 1851 the Town purchased the "Meetin 
House," removed the steeple, and moved the 
building to the present site of the Town Hall. In 
addition to its "official" uses, the Hall was used 
as a school and a library through the years until 
it was destroyed by fire on March 20, 1907. The 
present Congregational Church was built in 
1852. 





Town Hall about 1905. The 
small attachment at the left rear 
was used as an Armory. A 
portion of the carriage sheds 
built for the horses in 1807 can 
be seen in the back. The sheds 
were taken down in 1924. The 
white square in right foreground 
is the Town scales which were 
used for weighing wagon loads in 
sales transactions. 




Picture of new Town Hall used in dedication 
booklet. The Dedicatory Exercises of the new 
Halifax Town Hall were held on Friday, 
December 20, 1907 from 2 to 5 p.m. This was 
exactly nine months to the day after the old 
Town Hall was destroyed by fire on March 20, 
1907. The Building Committee was: Henry M. 
Bosworth*, Chairman; George Estes, Secretary; 
Frank Lyon, Frank Chaffin, Edward H. 
Vaughn, Jabez P. Thompson*, and Fred 
Simpson*. (* Selectmen) 



Town Hall showing the "tower" added in 
1942 for the observation of airplanes from 
the highest point in town. It was built by E. 
W. Harlow & Sons for $486.81, with 
additional costs for wiring, heat pipe, rope, 
etc., for a total of $590.77. The Town 
belonged to the First Interceptor Command, 
Aircraft Warning Service and received their 
Certificate of Authority for Observation 
Post 91 A of the Boston region on May 15, 
1942. The outside ladder was added in 1943 
by D. M. Briggs. This observation tower was 
manned around the clock during World War 
II. 




?!' !!!!!»»« 




Newly landscaped Town Hall, 
early in the 1920's. 












/*» 

















x t 



IT"*. > j 




2 



30. 



DUNBAR'S TAVERN 



The following description of Dunbar's Tavern was found in the files of the former Town 
Historian, Guy S. Baker. The information was originally found in an essay written by James 
Browning Thomas when he was a student of Kingston High School in 1895. 

This famous old house was torn down around 1900 in order to make a more spacious lawn for 
the estate of J. Levering Jones, a Philadelphia lawyer. The road now goes directly over where the 
old house stood on Plymouth Street (Route 106). 

It was built in a time when strength and sterling quality, not beauty and convenience, were 
sought after by mechanics who knew their business. Studded and braced in a way that would 
bewilder the carpenter of today, it has stood the test of wind and weather for nearly 200 years. 
The house stood on sort of a shelf on the east side of a hill. In the rear of the house is another hill 
where it is said the Sons of Liberty and other military organizations of the time met for drill and 
rifle practice. There was a large swamp on the east side and the marksmen always fired in that 
direction. A number of years ago, while local lumber men were getting shingle stuff out of this 
swamp, a number of lead bullets were found embedded in the trees. 

Now to come directly to the house. It was next to the oldest house in town and probably built 
about 1700. Just before the Revolution it seems to have been owned by a man by the name of 
Daniel Dunbar, a staunch royalist. One of the first things a visitor was shown on entering the 
house was a paper signed by Dunbar, as follows: "I, the subscriber do promise and solemnly 
engage to all the people assembled at Halifax, County of Plymouth on the 17th day of September 
1774 that I will never take hold, execute or exercise any commission, office or employment 
whatsoever under or by any authority, pretended or attempted to be given by the late act of 
parliament entitled — an act for the better regulation of the government of the Province of 
Massachusetts Bay in New England. 

(and below) At the request of about 300 il sign my name 

Daniel Dunbar" 

Things must have been hot for him for soon after, he left town and his property was confiscated 
by the government. 

There used to be a store joined to the west end of the house but when the last tenants moved in, 
there was nothing left in it but some gunpowder and a lot of brass buttons. When the store was 
torn off, the end farthest from the house which had been used as a counting room was saved and 
used as a corn house. The door into the house was made of two thicknesses of boards, one layer 
running lengthwise, the other across. 

Before entering the house, the obser- 
vant visitor was pretty sure to notice the 
shingles which were about as thick as 
wrapping paper. They were hand shaved. 
Entering the house on the north side, 
you entered the kitchen which was a low 
ceilinged room considerably longer than 
it was wide, having on one side a large 
fireplace and a brick oven, which had 
been supplemented later by a modern 
cooking range. 




A* 



GENERAL STORE — CENTER OF TOWN 







! Ill 










H. D. Packard store and Post Office with Packard residence 
in the background (formerly Pope's Tavern). 



^> 




General Store, Halifax center, opposite Town 
Hall, 1903. Frank D. Lyon & Co. store 
located to the left of Pope's Tavern. 




Town Square and George A. Estes store located here 
until the end of December 1908 when the business was 
moved down the hill by the library. There are two 
accounts as to what happened to the old store 
building: it was moved back and used as a cow barn 
on the farm here, or it was moved across the road by 
the cemetery and later burned. 



32 



POPE'S TAVERN 




Pope's Tavern is located across from the Town Hall. It was built prior to 1830 by 
Stafford Sturtevant for his son-in-law, Captain Henry Pope. On October 13, 1830 a 
convention was held "in the Tavern" at which time John Quincy Adams was 
nominated to the 23rd Congress. 




The house was also the setting for a 
book, Children of Parks Tavern, written 
by Mrs. Frances Humphrey. The library 
has a copy of the book. Daniel Webster 
frequented the Tavern on his trips 
through the town. In 1981 the Town 
purchased the Tavern and it is being 
restored. 



The Police Station, located next to the 
old Tavern, is in the vicinity of the barns 
which can be seen in the top photograph. 




CEMETERIES 



The Sturtevant Cemetery located on 
Route 106 was deeded June 1728 to 
the Proprietors of what was then 
Plympton, to be used as a burial 
ground. The following were named in 
the deed as having paid 6 pounds and 
10 shillings: 

James Bearce, David Bosworth, Peter 
Tomson, Robert Waterman, James Bryant, 
Jacob Chipman, William Sturtevant, John 
Cortis, James Sturtevant, John Briggs, 
Shuball Bearce, Ignatious Loring, Sam 
Sturtevant, Jr., Moses Sturtevant, Moses 
Cushman, David Bosworth, Jr., Jonathan 
Bosworth, Nehemiah Bosworth, John 
Tomson, Josiah Waterman, Ignatius 
Cushing and Benjamin Cortis. 




**SSESSfc* 



"&•£& 




[&&? 



» *&*,*-*■ 



1. 1 - "«*» ■ 



~v 




Perkins Family Burial Ground 

Wood Street, Halifax 
The following are names that were 
clear enough to be copied. This was 
done in the 1960's before the spot 
became overgrown with trees. When 
Cumberland Farms purchased the 
land and received permission from the 
Board of Appeals, a stipulation was 
made that the burial ground be fenced 
in. 

Jason Perkins 1877 
Annie, wife of Jason 1876 
J. Holmes Perkins 1841 
Edward, son of Jason and Annie 

Dec. 27, 1864 
Mercy Perkins 1874 
Mary, wife of Jason 1838 
Mercy, wife of Thomas Perkins 

March 10, 1841 
Charles H. Fuller April 9, 1870 



Central Cemetery, located 
behind the Town Hall. The 
first recorded burial was in 
1846. The cemetery has been 
extended through the years. 



34 





Tomson Cemetery on Thompson 
Street, Route 105. This land was 
deeded to the Town of Halifax as a 
burial ground by Thomas Tomson 
in 1742. 



This was the building on Thompson 
Street where Ebenezer Wood made 
gravestones that were used in the 
area from about 1815 to 1860. He 
prepared his own gravestone which 
is in the Thompson Street grave- 
yard, where much of his craftsman- 
ship can be seen. This building was 
located across the street from 42 
Thompson Street. 



Drew Family 
Burial Ground 

Thompson Street 
Halifax, Massachusetts 

Col. Thomas Drew July 22, 1845 
Polly Shaw, wife of Maj. Thomas Drew 

Jan. 22, 1853 
Major Thomas Drew Nov. 30, 1860 
Luc. Waterman, wife of Col. Thomas 

Drew Oct. 11, 1807 



35 



THE CIVIL WAR 



I 




CHARLES P. LYON, Halifax 

Minute Men of '61 

First Lieut. Co. A. 3rd Mass. Reg. 




NATHANIEL MORTON, Bryantville 

Minute Men of '61 

Lt. Co. A, 3rd Mass. Vols. 9 mos. 




THE ^^8ES?BS^I3 US*SSSS&9 

FOREVER I 




BeaJPS. 



PATRIOTS! 

BiliI TO THE STAHDABDI 

THE HALIFAX LIGHT INFANTRY 

I Jim ..il. -ml their MTvirra to the (ioi eminent for nine month*, unci it U highly nw^wtorj- that ha 

rfiiiL- I Id Ih ill ont-e rii-rniletl to the maximum wtnmltml. 

Till- ..rt'um/iilmn i«* tin- olilcot in the State, iiiwl wn* ehurtetpd hv 

JOHN HANOOOE 

in I7VA. Il Hpnfd iti tin- Wur or l*W. and waa unions the fimt to respond to the mil of th* 
lYi-ident. April IHtli. |M(M.' 

Viiluntifm fp.nn Halifuk, IliiliMin. Hanover, Ihixbury, Pembroke and other adjoining Town* arc 
intilvd lo i nli-i without ihliijt. IJi«h Town from » liein-e ret-mit* *rr rveeived will be credited tor 
e»er\ iimti. nml the* will U miDtlered ill iw intrf of the <pn>tnofthe Town in whieh lhe> rnodr. 
The %ueaory runvd U\ I he promotion of 1,1 M T. <'. I'. LYtM lo the rnptiiinev will not be filled until the 
Roll in I'ompiete. 

Ml Hill hi. HUH HI THE HIHAHOISE, HUIF4X. 



.C P. I.VON. 
N. MOKTON. 



IKlMt 



Local Civil War Recruiting Poster 



Civil War Monument, Halifax, Mass. 



BENJAMIN HARDING, Bndgewater 

Minute Men of '61 
Co. A, 3rd Massachusetts Regiment 





SYLVANUS BOURNE, Halifax 

Minute Men of '61 

Company A, Third Mass. Regiment 




ARTHUR HARRIS, E. Bndgewater 

Minute Men of '61 

Sergt. Co. A 3rd Mass. Reg. 

1st Mass. Heavy Artillery 




36 



One of the first military companies to receive a 
Charter from Governor Hancock was Company A, 
known as the Halifax Light Infantry, organized in 
1792. It was active in service from the war of 1812-14 
until it was ordered disbanded by Governor Rice on 
July 6, 1876. At that time there were six companies in 
Massachusetts and, to reduce the expenses for the 
state's volunteer militia, all were ordered disbanded 
except for two. 

During the War of 1812, Company A was 
commanded by Captain Asa Thompson. From all 
reports, the Captain from Halifax was a giant of a 
man standing 6' 7" with hat in hand. The figure was 
revised upward to 8' when the Captain wore his hat 
and when Company A marched through South 
Boston, both children and adults are said to have 
gathered to get a look at his towering form. Though 
Captain Thompson's unusual height made him a 
focal point of attention wherever his Troop appeared, 
large black bearskin caps worn by his men assured 
them their own brief notoriety. 

When President Lincoln issued his first Proclama- 
tion for Troops, Company A (as minute men) 
reported for duty. Commanded by Captain Joseph 
Harlow, Company A was assigned to the Third 
Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers, and was made 
up of men from Halifax and a few nearby towns. 
Captain Joseph Harlow, "zealous and patriotic 
officer, rode all night through the towns in which the 
members of the company resided, summoning them 
to meet on Boston Common the next day, by order of 
Governor John A. Andrew. This midnight ride has 
been fittingly compared to that of Paul Revere." 
(Gammons page 67) 

Listed below are names and bits of information for 
men from Halifax as recorded by the Reverend John 
G. Gammons, on pages 98-1 14 of his book, The Third 
Massachusetts Regiment, published in 1906. Indicated 
ages are those at the time of enlistment. 

"Charles P. Lyon, First Lieutenant; Halifax 36. A 
great admirer of and worker for the interests of 
Company A; has held nearly every office in the 
company from corporal to captain. He rendered such 
timely assistance to Captain Harlow in notifying the 
members of the company to report on Boston 
Common, that, notwithstanding the order was 
received at night, the following morning saw Halifax 
'Minute Men' on the early train armed and equipped, 
according to the call of the 'War Governor' and 
President Lincoln, with every man present. For years 
after the war he served as captain of the company. 
His town honored him and itself in sending him to the 
Legislature, where his voice and his vote was always 
on the right side. By trade a bootmaker, his work 
stood first-class. Born and always residing in Halifax, 
he has always enjoyed the confidence and good-will 
of his fellow citizens; and now in the sunshine of a 
grand and fully rounded out life, he awaits orders to 



the higher and better life, honored and loved by all 
his associates, including every member of Company 
A." 

"Nathaniel Morton, Second Lieutenant; Halifax 
21. The gentleman, the scholar, the officer, the 
soldier, 'the modest man,' who proudly wears the 
'Minute Men's Medal' presented to him by the 
commonwealth for meritorious service. He partici- 
pated in the burning of Gosport Navy Yard and 
assisted Captain Lyon in recruiting the company in 
1862. Has held all the higher offices in the town of 
Halifax and Pembroke for the last twenty-seven 
years; prominent in probate business; honored and 
respected by his townsmen. He resides in Bryantville, 
Mass., where, with his accomplished wife, he 
cordially welcomes all his friends." 

Although no photographs of enlisted men have yet 
been forthcoming, there would have been no Halifax 
Light Infantry without them. 

"Drew, George 3rd, Halifax; 21. Re-enlisted. 
Killed in battle. A good brave soldier." 

"Fuller, Frederick E., Halifax; 18. Died in 
Newbern, N.C. Dec. 1, 1862. This being the first 
death in Company A and Fred being so young, it 
made a lasting impression on the company. We 
buried him under a tree near our camp." 

"Haven, Perley, Halifax; 25. Farmer. Resides at 
Thomastown. Post office, Middleboro, Mass." 

"Hayward, Luther W., Halifax; 23. Died at Halifax 
July 6, 1863. Buried at Hanson, Mass. Unmarried." 

"Hayward, Lysander W., Halifax; 18. A brave 
soldier, a trusted citizen. Farmer and coal dealer. Has 
a family. Post office, Halifax, Mass." 

"Holmes, Martin L., Halifax; 18. Boot and 
shoemaker. An honored citizen, industrious and 
frugal. Has a wife. Post office, Rockland, Mass." 

"Marston, William T., Halifax; 27. Discharged for 
disability, May 27, 1863. A good, faithful soldier. 
Reported living in Bridgewater, Mass." 

"Packard, Horace F., Halifax; 20. A soldier 'who 
needeth not be ashamed.' Resides in Brockton, 
Mass." 

"Porter, Oliver C, Halifax; 35. A good all-round 
soldier. Died Feb. 18, 1873. Buried in Halifax, Mass." 

"Richmond, Joseph S. W., Halifax; 18. Died—." 

"Soule, Charles W., Halifax; 18. Died in hospital, 
Newbern, Dec. 2, 1862. Buried near our camp. Body 
sent home and buried in family cemetery." 

"Thompson, Morton, Halifax; 18. Teacher. Died 
in Halifax, Mass. Left a family." 

"Whitney, Charles T., Halifax; 27. Discharged for 
disability, March 4, 1863. Boot and shoemaker. A 
respected citizen. Has a family. Post office Halifax, 
Mass." 

"Wood, Cyrus, Halifax; 40. Died and was buried in 
Halifax. One son living." 



37 



WORLD WAR I 



A Welcome 


Home 


TO THE 




Soldiers, Sailors, 


and Nurse 


of Halifax, Massacnusetts, 


Wlo Took Part in tne 


1914 — World War — 1918 


Town Hall, Halllax, Wednesday 


Evening, Nov. 19, 


1919 

' = 





HONOR ROLL 




GEORGE WHITE —Entered English service 
Mar., 1915. Was in German Prison a long time. 
Last report was alive. 

SERGEANT ALBERT B. WOOD — Enlisted 
Sept. 18, 1917. Stationed at Fort Banks. 
Appointed First Sergeant Oct. 1, 1918. Final 
transfer to 33rd Regiment Artillery, C.A.C. 
Discharged Dec. 23, 1918. 

PERLEY S. WARREN — Enlisted in Navy Sept. 
26, 1917. Assigned to Commonwealth Pier, So. 
Boston. Final transfer to U.S.S.P. No. 2840, Aug. 

4, 1919. Present duty. 

ELVIN L. WOOD — Entered service Oct. 5, 
1917. Trained at Camp Devens in Co. G, 302nd 
Infantry. Transfer to Camp Gordon. Discharged 
Jan. 31, 1918. 

EDWIN H. HAYWARD — Entered service Oct. 

5, 1917. Trained at Camp Devens with 302nd 
Supply Co. Served in France from July 3, 1918 to 
Feb. 26, 1919. Discharged Apr. 18, 1919. 

ALLEN LEACH— Enlisted in Navy Oct. 9, 1917. 
Assigned to R.S., Norfolk, Va. Final transfer to 
U.S.S. Koningin Der Nederlander. Served in war 
zone from Apr. 20, 1918 to Nov. 11, 1918. 
Awarded Victory Badge. Discharged Oct. 14, 
1919. 

SERGEANT GUY S. BAKER— Enlisted Nov. 1, 

1917. Assigned to Medical Dept. at Fort Slocum, 
N.Y. Final transfer to Battery C, 4th Regiment, 
F.A.R.D. Appointed Inst. Sergeant Nov. 10, 

1918. Discharged Jan. 3, 1919. 

LEON GARVIN — Enlisted 1917. 

CESARE GENTILE — Enlisted Apr. 27, 1918. 
Trained at Framingham in 47th Co., 151st Depot 
Brigade. Discharged July 18, 1918. 




r 



NETTA MAY STEEVES — Enlisted as Nurse 
Apr. 24, 1918. Assigned to U.S.A. General 
Hospital No. 9, Lakewood, N.J. Served in France 
from June 24, 1918 to Apr. 26, 1919. Citations 
from Commander-in-chief A.E.F.,July, 1918and 
Sept., 1918. 

CORPORAL GEORGE DI MESTICO — 

Entered service Apr. 25, 1918. Trained at Camp 
Devens in Depot Brigade. Transferred to 42nd 
Infantry. Discharged Jan. 22, 1919. 

ARTHUR R. WATERMAN — Entered service 
June 27, 1918. Assigned to Depot Brigade at 
Camp Dix, N.J. Transferred to 312th Engineers. 
Served in France from Aug. 7, 1918 to Dec. 12, 
1918. Discharged Jan. 24, 1919. 

FRANK E. HARLOW — Enlisted in Navy June 
27, 1918. Assigned to Training Camp at 
Hingham. Released from active duty Mar. 19, 
1919. 

CORPORAL FRANK A. PURPURA — Entered 
service June, 1918. Assigned to Camp Devens, 
Co. E, 301st Supply Train. Served in France from 
Aug. 1, 1918 to May 24, 1919. Discharged June 
11, 1919. 

GEORGE W. ESTES — Entered service July 21, 
1918. Assigned to 151st Depot Brigade at Camp 
Devens. Transferred to Frade Test Section. 
Discharged Dec. 3, 1918. 

SYLVANUS F. BOURNE — Enlisted Oct. 15, 
1918. Assigned to Army Training Corps, 
Wentworth Institute. Discharged Dec. 6, 1918. 

CLYDE O. BOS WORTH — Enlisted Oct. 15, 
1918. Assigned to Army Training Corps, 
Wentworth Institute. Transferred to Fort Banks. 
Discharged Dec. 23, 1918. 

ALBERT A. THOMAS — Enlisted in Naval 
Reserves Oct. 24, 1918. Assigned to Dunwoody 
Training Station, Minneapolis, Minn. Released 
from active duty Feb. 23, 1919. 

EDWARD H. PETERSON — Entlisted in Navy 
Mar. 5, 1918. Assigned to Receiving Ship at 
Hingham. Final transfer to U.S.S. Bali. Released 
from active duty Feb. 7, 1919. 

EARL S. WOOD — Enlisted in Merchant Marine 
Service, May 23, 1918. Assigned to Training Ship 
Meade, East Boston. Transfer to Training Ship 
President, Norfolk, Va. In active service since 
Oct. 13, 1918. 



WORLD WAR II 




jjonor SlflU irfttrattmt 

Fairfax ^onm ^Jfall, 3)ul ? 4, 1943 at 7 p.m. 




PIANO SELECTION Myrtie B. Armstrong 

OH, BEAUTIFUL THE SPACIOUS SKIES (35o) 

Audience 

INVOCATION Father Magu : re 

SOLO Marjone McCleave 

THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 

Edward A. Lincoln 

ADDRESS Capt Charles W. Lawrance 

SOLO Marjorie McCleave 

DEDICATION OF HONOR ROLL and SERVICE FLAG 

Rev. W\ A. Leonard 

THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER (357) Audience 

BENEDICTION 



38 




Through the efforts of the Grange (one of whose members donated the stone) and the American Legion, the 
monument honoring World War II veterans was dedicated in 1945. Those taking part are from left to 
right: Martha Eaton, Marion Stoddard, Lala Foley, Josephine Ladd, Hilda Watson, Harry Brown, David Briggs, 
William Ladd, E. Laurence Grover, Roland Minott, William Foley and Charles Eaton. 




MEMORIAL DAY 1946 — Some of the men and women who served during World War II. Front, left to right, 
Arthur Thomas, Cesare Gentile, Jr., Albert Kiernan, Warren Kiernan, Kenneth Holmes, Josephine Wladkowski, 
Edward Wladkowski, Frank Purpura. Back, George Thomas, Warren MacLaughlin, Percy Brown, Carl Burgess, 
William Moffatt, Daniel Bosworth, Leo Hinchey, and Myron Wood, Jr. 



39 



MONUMENTS AND MARKERS 



The Civil War Monument dedicated on July 4, 1867, was 
the first one erected in the State of Massachusetts. At an 
early hour, long lines of vehicles with happy occupants in 
gala attire converged at the Town Hall and Common. 
Roster Co. A, Third Massachusetts Regiment, Minute Men 
of '61, Halifax Light Infantry with Captain Lyon, 
Lieutenants M. V. Bonney and L. M. Thompson, and 50 
men in regular uniform marched to the front of the 
gathering with inspiring music for the commencement of the 
day's activities. At 10:00 a.m. a line of march was taken up 
by the Chief Marshal, the men of the Halifax Light Infantry, 
guests of the day, municipal officers, Orator of the Day, 
Honorable Russell, Past Members of the Infantry, Veterans 
of the War of 1812 in carriages, Soldiers of the Rebellion, 
children of the schools, citizens of Halifax, and citizens of 
other towns. They marched to Morton's artificial grove 
nearly a mile from the hall where a speaker's stand and seats had been prepared. The speaker of the day 
was Judge Thomas Russell, followed by a band. The procession formed again and marched back to the 
monument to the music of a dirge with reversed arms and afterwards fired a volley over the mound, and 
then a fervent prayer was offered. The day's festivities continued with a dinner for 700 to 800 under a 
spacious tent with toasts, etc. The assemblage dissolved about 3:00 p.m. with the approach of a 
threatening storm. The monument was erected through the efforts of Mrs. Aroline Soule. The iron 
fence was taken down and used for scrap during World War II. 









y 


Soldiers ' JKConument 


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PLYMOUTH STREET 

The dedication of the Soldiers' Monu- 
ment erected by the Town in memory of 
the Soldiers of the Revolution was held 
on June 17, 1911. The program at the 
Monument had a prayer, a song, the 
unveiling of the tablet by Bertha 
Thompson and Sylvanus Bourne, the 
pledge to the flag, the presentation of the 
tablet by Fred Simpson, the acceptance 
of the tablet by Jabez P. Thompson, 
Chairman of Selectmen, and then the 
singing of "America." The program at the Town Hall followed with a welcome by Fred Simpson, 
response by Mrs. George O. Jenkins, Secretary of the Massachusetts Daughters of the Revolution, 
address by the Hon. John D. Long, ex-Governor, a solo, "Let Me Like a Soldier Fall," another address 
by the Hon. Samuel W. McCall, M.C., a musical selection, another address by the Hon. Robert C. 
Harris, M.C., the singing of "America," and the benediction by Rev. Harrison L. Packard. 



SOUTH STREET 
Muster Field is the site of the drill field of the oldest 
Militia in the State of Massachusetts. Their commission was 
granted in 1792 by Governor John Hancock and they 
rendered their services for over 100 years. This militia 
company organized in 1792 and chose Ignatius Loring for 
their Captain; Elisha Faxon, Lieutenant; and Ebenezer 
Thomson, Ensign. They patriotically equipped themselves, 
even to a uniform, without getting any fee or reward. The 
government provided only the gun and its bayonet. This site 
was marked for the Bi-centennial in 1934 with a plaque 
affixed in 1961 by the Town at a cost of $100. 




40 




Charles A. Lindbergh 

PARIS, FRANCE via 

HALIFAX, MASS. 

May 21, 1927 





X ** 


M*& 




w 





Spirit of Saint Louis 



Lindbergh flew directly over the town of Halifax on his historic flight across the Atlantic. The 
Halifax Grange called Paris with a congratulatory message and received this reply: 



w 


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... 





.RS 


TRUST COHJPANY 




1 


3*5, 


P}ace Vendime 
PKRJLS 








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BANKERS TRUST COMPANY 










3 & 5 


Place Vendome 












PARIS 


(France) 














Your k: 


nd 


message 


has been 


received 


and 


I beg 


you to accept 


the 


assurance of my 


appreciation 


of yoi 


ir good wishes 


















Cil>lA 


Sincerely yours , 


n 







Public Library and General Store, Halifax, Mass. 



41 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



The year 1984 is an important milestone for the Halifax Fire 
Department as well as the Town of Halifax. On August 24, 
1984 the Halifax Fire Department will be 75 years old. 

The Fire Department was formed as a result of a number of 
destructive fires. The change over from water power to wood 
and coal-fired boilers during the last half of the nineteenth 
century in local factories and mills, and resultant boiler 
explosions and fires caused great financial loss to the town. A 
fire in the company-run store on Furnace Street in 1847 
destroyed the store, three houses and a woolen mill. This fire 
was responsible for the loss of fifty jobs, a tremendous blow to 
a town with roughly two hundred permanent residents. At the 
turn of the century the town suffered more loss by fire. In 1905 
the Hotel Monponsett burned, and in 1907 the original town 
hall and library were destroyed by fire, and a watchman was 
paid to see that embers from the fire did not ignite other 
buildings close by including the Congregational Church, the 
carriage shed, and Pope's Tavern. 

On August 24, 1909 a group of men met at the Town Hall 
and sixteen of those attending signed up as charter members of 
the Halifax volunteer fire department. The Halifax Grange 
and the Halifax Improvement Society each donated twenty- 
five dollars for the purchase of soda-acid fire extinguishers. 

In the event of a fire (signaled by the ringing of the church 
bell), the fire extinguishers were loaded into the blacksmith's 
wagon and rushed to the fire. Jared B. Baker was the 
blacksmith and was also elected the first fire chief. The Grover 
Corner schoolhouse was donated to the fire department and 
moved from the corner of Plymouth and Monponsett Streets 
to a spot just west of the library where it served as the fire 
station until the present station was built in 1961. Geo. Harry 
Armstrong brought the first fire truck, a Locomobile forest 
fire truck, from Cambridge to Halifax in the 1920's. 

In the early years the department was supported by 
donations from civic groups such as the Halifax Grange and 
the Ladies Auxiliary. Fund raisers such as dances and field 
days were held to purchase and upgrade equipment. Over the 
years the department came to be supported wholely by the 
town, using appropriated funds to upgrade the service 
provided. 

From 1945 until his retirement in 1979, Chief Oscar Gassett 
guided and improved the service delivered by the department. 
This same commitment to quality fire protection is being 
carried on by the present Chief, Kenneth Calvin. 

While the history of the town has at times been altered by 
the ravages of fire, Halifax has been blessed with a low loss of 
life record. With continual upgrading of the Halifax Fire 
Department, this proud record will be maintained. 

The members of the Halifax Fire Department wish the town 
a happy 250th birthday and many, many more. 




In the beginning, 2 horse team with hand fire 
extinguishers in the back of the "democrat" 
wagon of the fire chief. Left: Albert Thomas, on 
the back, G. Harry Armstrong about 1919. 




Locomobile Forest Fire Truck, early 1920's. 




Our two fire engines ready to roll down the 
ramp at Fire Station when it was to the west of 
Town Hall in the 1930's. In the truck to the left, 
"Young Harry," G. Harry Armstrong, and 
right, Warren Ellis. 



42. 





Center, Jared Baker, Chief, Volunteer Fire Department when 
formed in 1909 until 1921. 



George Harry Armstrong, Chief, Board 
of Fire Engineers — 1922-1926. 





David M. Briggs, Chief, Board 
of Fire Engineers — 1927-1945. 



iii Hi- bb 

IB W ^ 

/N OF h 



Oscar Gassett, Chief, Fire Department 1945-1978 shown with 1950 truck 
and Fire Inspector Feeney. 





Chief Gassett with new 1967 truck. In 1957 Town voted the position 
of Chief of Fire Department. 



Kenneth Calvin, Chief, Fire 
Department 1979 to present. 



.43 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



For years elected Constables provided police 
protection in town. In 1924 the Halifax Police 
Department was established by Town Meeting 
vote. The first police chief was William L. 
Robertson who served from 1925 through 1928, 
after which Charles Donati served as chief until 
1936. The next Chief was Elvin Wood who 
served for 1937 and 1938. Then Charles Donati 
was appointed again from 1939 to 1941. Howard 
L. Waterman, Sr., was appointed in 1942 and 
served until his retirement in 1979. The present 
chief is James A. Booth. 

Through the years after the Police Depart- 
ment was established, part-time officers were 
appointed in addition to the two elected 
constables. 

For years the Police Department shared a 
small space in the building where the Fire 
Department is now located. In 1981 a Police 
Station was built. In this new building there is a 
much needed cell for both male and female 
prisoners. 

The police force now has ten men plus an 
Auxiliary Police force consisting of eight men 
and women. 




Chief James A. Booth 
1979 to Present 





Charles Donati, Police Chief 
1929-1936 and 1939-1941 







■■ ■■»■#»». 


3 




¥ 


T» 


JBm 



Elvin Wood, Police Chief - 1937 and 1938 




Howard L. Waterman 
Appointed Police Officer 1940; Elected Constable 1941; 
Appointed Part-Time Chief 1942; Appointed Full-Time 
Chief 1962; Retired as Chief Jan. 1, 1979; First Full-Time 
Police Chief to retire from the Halifax Police Department; 
37 Years as Police Chief 



44 



DEPOTS 




HALIFAX DEPOT 



The Halifax depot was built in 1845 
near where the present railroad line 
crosses through Halifax on Holmes St. 
It was used extensively after it was built 
by the Old Colony Railroad's subordi- 
nate. However, when the Old Colony 
Nursery and greenhouses on Plymouth 
St. by Richmond Park burned and went 
out of business in 1890, the Old Colony 
Railroad did not use the station so 
much. In 1893 the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford Railroad took over 
the operation of the rail system. In 191 1 
the Halifax Grange paid for the installa- 
tion of a telephone in the station. Ed 
Dutton was the Station Master for 
many years. 



GENERAL DIVISIONS 

0LD C0L0JW JSYjSFEJfl. 

OLD COLONY RAILROAD. 

Central 111 vision 272.36 Miles. 

Provident* Division . &).'ii 

Northern Division 8R.«4 " 

(Jape Cod Division 130.38 

Total Mile* 6*6.61 

OLD COLONY STEAMBOAT CO. 

New York and Fall River 181 Mile*. 

New York and New bedford 186 " 

Total Miles. 3W 

PASSENGER STEAMERS. 

PURITAN. PILGRIM, PROVIDENCE,' OLD COLONY. 

PLYMOUTH (building). 

FREIGHT STEAMERS. 

CITY OF BROCKTON. CITY OF FALL RIVER. 

CITY OF NEW BEDFORD, CITY OF FITCHBURO. 

New Bedford, Vineyard and Nantucket Slramboat Co. 

New Bedford and Oak Bluffs 22 Miles. 

Oak Bluffs and Nantucket 28 '* 

Total Miles GO 

STEAMERS. 
NANTCCKKT, RIVER QUEEN, MARTHA'S VINEYARD. 

ISLAND HOME. M0NOUANSETT. 



INDEX OF PASSENGER SERVICE. 

PAOB 

Abtngton, and Bridge water and Brockton Branches 16 

Boston and South braintree. and Suburban Service 4-6 

Boston. Fall River, and Newport, via Taunton, and via Brockton 7-B 

Boston, and Providence, Newport. JJcW London. New Haven, and New 

JfOl'fc 20-21 

Cape Cod Service, from and to Boston 18 

Chatham Branch Service is 

De.lb.uii and Suburban Service 22-24 

Eaaton Branch Service. Brockton and Slough ton Central n 

FBtrhaven Branch Service 19 

Fall River Line 82 

Fltchhnrg and Marlboro, to and from Boston. Central Division Station*. 
Cot lane City. Nnntucket. Fall River, Newport, New York, Paw- 
tucket, and Providence 28-29 

Fttchburgt Local Service), Pratt's Junction, and Worcester 30 

Granite Branch Service 12 

Hanover Branch Service, from nnd to Boston 18 

Lowell. Manslleid. and Central, and Providence Division stations. Fall 

River, Newport. Cottage CUT. Nantucket, and New York 27 

Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket Service 17 

M iddleboro. to and from Taunton and Providence ia 

Nantasket Beach Service 31 

New Bedford nnd Fall River, via Branch 16 

North Attleboro, to n nil from Providence and Boston 25 

Providence. Attleboro. and Mansfield (additional trains).-.. h 

Shawinut and Milton Branches, to and from Boston u 

Shore Line 82 

South Shore. Dnxbury, and Plymouth KM1 

S tough ton Central and Easton. via Canton Junction from and to Boston.. 25 

" Suburban Homes " on the Old Colony 18 

Stonlngton Line SO 

Taunton and New Bedford) from and to Boston and Providence U 1 1 

Warren. Bristol, Fall River, and Newport, from and to Providence 28 

Woods I loll Branch Service is 




MONPONSETT DEPOT 

In 1880 the Old Colony Railroad sponsored the formation of the 
Monponsett Lake and Land Company and built the Monponsett 
flag station near the Halifax line. However, it was too small and 
proved to be inadequate with the increasing popularity of the Lakes 
as a recreational and vacation area for people from the city, includ- 
ing those who had summer homes and those who stayed at the 
Hotel Monponsett. And so, a new station was built in Monponsett 
in 1905 using some of the material taken from the old station. It 
was a very busy spot when the trains came in as this picture shows, 
with the coaches waiting to take the passengers to the Hotel or 
Mayflower Grove and buggies waiting for family members to get 
home. 



Circa 1840's 




.45 



POST OFFICES 



If 


• 1 M^r 

r • 


















The old mail coach with Stephen P. Lull who met the mail 
train at Halifax depot. Because of his regular trips to and 
from the depot and post office near the Town Hall, he was 
also hired by the school committee to "cart" scholars to 
school. 




The Public Library was one of 
the sites of the town's Post 
Office for nineteen years after 
the old Town Hall burned. 
Shown here is Postmaster and 
Librarian Thomas Morton 
who walked a mile to work and 
back everyday, even when he 
was 79 years old. 





^^^WWRt 


• 

■ 












1 


J.S. POST OFFICE, 


Halifax, Plymouth County, Mass. 


Established 


on December 30, 1814 






Length of Service 


POSTMASTERS 


Appt. Dates 


Yrs. Mos. Days 


Jotham Cushman 


Dec. 30, 1814 


02 - 02 - 27 


Obediah Lyon 


Mar. 28, 1817 


16 - 03 - 24 


Henry Pope 


July 23, 1833 


14-01 -28 


Zadock Thompson, Jr. 


Sept. 22, 1847 


03-00-15 


Cyrus Morton, Jr. 


Oct. 7, 1850 


01-10- 16 


Cyrus Morton 


Aug. 24, 1852 


02 - 04 - 02 


Eliab Poole 


Dec. 27, 1854 


05-10- 14 


Sylvanus R. Fuller 


Nov. 12, 1860 


00-05-21 


Horace W. Poole 


May 4, 1861 


01-08- 15 


Caleb Poole, Jr. 


Jan. 20, 1863 


09-11-15 


Harrison D. Packard 


Jan. 6, 1873 


10 - 02 - 25 


Alson Poole 


Apr. 2, 1883 


00-07-20 


Harrison D. Packard 


Nov. 23, 1883 


12-02- 17 


Thomas D. Morton 


Feb. 11, 1896 


31-05-06 


Hilda Thomas (Acting) 


July 18, 1927 


00-00-24 


Harry D. Minor 


Aug. 12, 1927 


14-07- 18 


Rufus O. Case 


Apr. 1, 1942 


22 - 04 - 29 




John F. Landry 


Aug. 31, 1964 


19 - 03 - 23 



This building, located next to Lewis' 
Restaurant, served as our Post Office in the 
1950's. Prior to this, the Post Office was 
housed in Case's store. Below is today's 
Post Office built in 1976. 




46 



HOLMES PUBLIC LIBRARY 




Holmes Public Library, Plymouth Street, Halifax, Massachusetts 




In 1876 Dr. Holmes donated $100.00 along with a 
proposition to start a free library in Halifax. This was 
accepted at a Town Meeting on November 7, 1876. The 
library was first housed in the Town Hall. When this 
burned in 1907, the library had a temporary home in the 
Congregational Church. 

In 1908 the town appropriated $1,000.00. The old 
schoolhouse from South Halifax was a gift from the J. 
L. Jones family. It was subsequently moved, converted 
and became the town's first library building. For the 
first few years, the Post Office shared the building. The 
old schoolhouse forms the core of our present library. 



Dr. Howland Holmes of Lexington, 
Mass., brother of John Holmes of Halifax 




Library as it looks in 1983 



Clarence Devitt's R.F.D. 
Mail Buggy 




47 



SCHOOLS 



The first educational entry in Halifax records, dated December 4, 1732, directs the selectmen to 
provide a schoolmaster for the "Town." Beginning in 1734, Rev. John Cotton, the first minister, did 
some teaching; by 1738 Town Meeting voted Jonathan Sears schoolmaster for the coming year — he 
remained 13 more ! In 1741 it was voted school should be kept 4 months at easterly part of town, 3 
months near the intersection of Plymouth and Elm Streets, 2 months on land of Nehemiah Bosworth 
and the final 3 months in the southerly part of town. 

Public schooling, as we know it, began in Halifax in the mid 1800's. Eventually the school 
program required five school districts: 

1. Corner of Holmes and Plymouth Streets 

2. Junction of Routes 58 and 106 (Grover's Corner) 

3. Fuller Bridge on South Street 

4. Thompson Street 

5. Elm Street 

These schools were administered by a Prudential Committee in each district. They hired the 
teachers, arranged their board and room, paid their salaries and periodically examined them. 
Teachers were occasionally hired as late as the night before school started! 




Schoolhouse #1 
Northwest corner of Plymouth & Monponsett Streets 





Moved in 1976 
to South Street 
to become home 
of the Historical 
Society 



Moved in 1910 to become first Fire Station 



By 1854 a school committee of five (one from each district) was chosen, and a superintendent was 
voted by ballot. In our first published Town Report — 1857 — school committee members were to 
receive $1.00 a meeting, only! 

In 1858 a vote defeated building a Central school. Teachers' pay now up to $22.50 a month, with 
the town paying $15.00 for board. 

Children in 1874 were dropping out of school to work in town factories. 



48 



SCHOOLS 




Former South Street School 
moved in 1908 to become core 
of Holmes Library 



The total school budget for 1880 for teachers, janitors and wood for heat was $763.00. 
Suggestions began to surface regarding repairs, and appeals for parental concern. The committee 
felt students were poor readers and did not believe corporal punishment was to be wholly discarded 
and should be used with "great calmness, mildness and consideration." There were 30 weeks of 
school with a total of 65 pupils. 

1885 was the first year it was voted that the school committee should purchase, at town expense, 
text books and supplies and loan them free to students. Schools began to fall into disrepair, teachers 
were hard to find, attendance fluctuated — there were many complaints. By 1878 we were down to 
four schools. 





1880 — Purchased by John Thompson — still standing on original site on Thompson Street — 1983 





The Elm Street School building, which had been moved twice, was still active in the early 1900's. On 
the right is the Elm Street School after it was converted into a home. 



49 



SCHOOLS 



In the 1890's, Eugene Deane, teacher and the first principal, taught classes held in the Town Hall. 




Graduabioi) Exercises 



Halifax High & Grammar School 

TOWN HALL. 

Friday Evening, 3une 23, '99 

-«aja at 8 o'clock. w»- 




PROGRAMME. 



I'KAYEll. 

SONG OF WELCOME, 

School. 

•SALUTATORY A KSSAY— Good Kca.lini;. 

Kl slK M. Tll.LSON. 

SINGING— On, On, We Glide. 

• ESSAY— Higll School Work, 

Gkacie A. Thompson. 

SONG-Over the Fields of Clover. 

•CLASS HISTORY. WILL A I'HOPHKCY, 
Myhiif. B. Ertkk 

SINGING- Rindi Will Meet bv and By, 
School. 

•ESSAY A VALEDICTORY— Cla«s Motto: 
Wc Build the Ladder b* Which We llise, 
Hahuy B. Gkovbk 
PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS. 
CLASS SONG 
• 1'ivrtif assigned hy vote of the class. 



After the exercises, a reception was held at which ice cream and cake were served in the school 
room. The company then returned to the main hall upstairs where two short plays were given, one 
by the boys and the other by the girls. The audience dispersed, ending one of the happiest events in 
the history of the times. The whole town was there; the gathering was the largest seen in the Town 
Hall for many years. 

Finally, in 1904, the Assembly voted for a Central School. The building plans were approved in 
twenty days. The four schoolhouses were sold at auction to finance furnishings for the new school. 
The land donated by Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Jones was accepted and an iron fence erected around the 
property. 

When the Central School opened in 1905, there were three teachers. One room for grades 1, 2 and 
3, a second room for grades 4, 5 and 6, and the third room for grades 7, 8, 9 and 10. The fourth room 
was not used at that time. 

It wasn't until 1910 that the first woman was elected to the school committee (universal suffrage 
did not come into effect until 1919). Here, women were allowed to vote on school matters and to 
hold office. Mrs. Jared B. Baker was instrumental in initiating a course of study that would help 
children attain a higher education than the 8th grade, and improved health standards. 




Central School, 1905, on Plymouth Street 



50. 



SCHOOLS 



Without a high school or any transportation to a neighboring town, it required considerable effort 
and sacrifice for a child to pursue a higher education. For many years students boarded with friends 
or relatives, away from Halifax, to attend school until 1913, when the school committee voted to pay 
high school transportation costs as the law allowed in towns with a population of less than 500. By 
1914 the cost was $2,000. 



><» ■ " ' ■ ' — i 







Central School in the 1920's 



Back of school showing Tramp house 



By 1907, $157.70 was expended to install 32 window screens and 3 screen doors in the interest of 
good health. 

A 1929 rising vote of thanks accepted the parcel of land adjoining the rear of the school yard, to 
be known as the "Vaughn Memorial Playground." 

By 1921 motorized transportation took all high school children to Bridgewater. In 1935 they were 
transferred to Whitman. 1954 saw the opening of Silver Lake Regional High School. 

The year 1947 saw the addition of 2 rooms to Central School, which were not adequate for very 
long. Finally the town purchased the land occupied by the vacant Standish Manor for today's 
Elementary School which opened its' doors in 1960. Six more rooms were added in 1965. The old 
Central School is still in use. 




d 



Former estate used as the Standish Manor 
School for exceptional girls 






Today's elementary staff for over 600 pupils is 
approximately 40 teachers and aides. Fiscal 1984's 
TOTAL school budget for Halifax K-12 will be 
$1,958,823.00. 

Early Childhood Educational 
Center opened in 1975 



SCHOOL TRANSPORTATION 




One of the first vehicles for scholar transportation was 
called the "School Barge," a horse-drawn coach with 
roll-down curtain sides to keep out the inclement 
weather. 




A later model of the horse drawn coach/school bus had 
more permanent sides with isinglass roll-down windows. 
This coach being larger to carry more passengers was 
much heavier and required two horses to pull it. 




In 1922 the first motorized school bus in Halifax was the 
Reo owned by Clyde O. Bosworth shown here. It was of 
wooden body construction as were the horse-drawn 
vehicles and had one door on the driver's side and a 
door in the rear for passengers to use as the horse-drawn 
vehicles had, also. It had wooden bench seats on the 
sides and fold-down glass windows. 




One of the later school buses from the mid twenties to 
the early thirties is shown here. It is larger and longer 
with two-part windows that went up and down. 



In 1869 the General Court enacted the following law: 
Chap. 132 AN ACT Relating to the Conveyance of 
Children to and from the Public Schools. Be it 
enacted, etc., as follows: — Sec. 1. Any town in this 
Commonwealth may raise, by taxation or otherwise, 
and appropriate money to be expended by the School 
Committee in their discretion, in providing for the 
conveyance of pupils to and from the public schools. 
Sec. 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
Approved April 1, 1869. 

Prior to the enactment, families provided their own 
transportation. On March 15, 1875 the Town voted to 
consolidate the 5 district schools into 2 (1 primary, 1 
grammar) and all pupils were to be conveyed to and 
from the schools who resided beyond the radius of Wi 
miles from the Town House where the school was to 
be housed. And so public school transporatation 
began here. 

The 1876 Report says that 87 scholars of all ages were 
in the school and that transportation created a 
business, however small, in the hardest of times. 
There was expended $552.05. 

However, the following year it was voted to go back 
to 3 district schools because the people were dissatis- 
fied with the previous year. And to quote from the 
1877 Report: "Transporting scholars at the expense 
of the town is not in popular favor at the present time. 
Etc.,". 

In 1890 the cost of transportation was only $12.45. In 
1894 the School Report says, "Reason, sound and 
good judgement declare that taking the months 
together as they come, children can be conveyed in 
greater comfort and less fatigue than when they are 
obliged to walk long distances. In Massachusetts the 
idea of transportation has come to stay. Where the 
plan has been faithfully tried, it gives great 
satisfaction." 

By 1898 the cost of transportation was back up 
around $300 for 89 scholars in an effort to improve 
attendance in the district schools, because truancy 
was a serious problem which the School Committee 
tried to control by providing limited transportation so 
families would send their children to school. 

When the Central School was built in 1905 the 
resulting increase in the cost of transportation of 79 
scholars went from $385.84 to $950.42 plus the cost of 
a coach of $145.00. There were 3 routes awarded to 
various bidders. By 1912 there were 4 routes 
throughout the town. Also, in 1912 the School 
Committee voted to inform the owners and drivers of 
the school coaches "to require the children to retain 
their seats in the coach after once getting in until they 
reach the Schoolhouse and in no case to hang or ride 



52, 



on the steps of the coach while going to or from 
school and to require all children who wish to ride 
home to take their seats in an orderly manner in the 
coach at the schoolhouse. We do this to guard against 
danger of injury to the children." 

The first unofficial motorized transportation was in 
September 1916 when the School Committee voted to 
notify one of the bidders to drive the coach on school 
route instead of auto. However, in 1919 the School 
Superintendent said in his Report: "This matter 
should receive the serious attention of the School 
Committee and all interested. Simply getting the child 
to school and back home again is not all that is 
necessary, this should be done under the best 
conditions possible and it is not done in an open or 
even closed drafty wagon with cold floors. Suitable 
heated bodies for the carriages ought to be obtained 
either by the town or by those who drive the teams. If 
a term contract could be made with someone to do 
this, such an arrangement might be made." And so, in 
1920 one of the Routes was awarded to Clyde 
Bosworth and was to be covered by auto. In 1922 the 
Committee voted to combine 2 of the routes and it 
was awarded to Mr. Bosworth, and he was to use a 
"Motor Bus." This proved to be so successful that the 
Committee voted to motorize all Barge routes in 
1923. 

In 1924 the Committee interviewed all the barge 
drivers with regards to installing a device for opening 
and closing the rear door from the driver's seat. Also, 
in 1924 high school transportation was put out to bid 
and the cost of all school transportation was 
$4,159.21 which was the average cost through the 
1930's also for between 140 and 160 students. 

By 1955 the budget for transportation was $14,462.57 
with services now being provided for high school 
transportation to Whitman and in-town services for 
274 students in Grades 1 through 12. 

In 1982 the budget for transportation was $95,787.00 
for the Halifax School Department for 1,183 students 
from Kindergarten through 12th grade. Also, Special 
Education transportation services cost an additional 
$34,760.09 with a State reimbursement of $70,864.00. 





School buses of the eighties have continued to change. 
Black non-reflective paint has been added to the hoods 
to prevent reflection of light to the driver and black 
paint around the red school bus flashing lights to make 
them stand out to the driving public, along with mirrors 
to provide all-around visibility for the school bus 
operator. 



' * $ , 

4» SCHOOL BUS * 



Pk 




In the fifties school buses were still changing, larger, 
more lights for better visibility, with safety the prime 
factor. Regular State inspections of the vehicles and 
school bus driver exams were being required. 




In the mid thirties, school buses had signs on top of the 
body, front and rear, as well as red lights, with the door 
now operated by the driver for the passengers. Safety 
features were more numerous, including shatterproof 
glass. 



By the early thirties, school buses had grown in size and 
structure with metal bodies, dual rear wheels and bigger 
engines, as this Dodge shows. 



53 



GONE BUT NOT FORGOTTEN 




~4 







The Major Thomas Drew homestead on Plymouth Street was built about 1750. Major Drew during the 
Revolutionary War used to hold militia reviews here. He died in November of 1860. Note that this house, as did all 
early homes, faced south and was of the garrison construction. It is unknown why their homes faced the south. 
Speculation is for religious/superstitious reasons; however, it is obvious now that it was the forerunner of solar 
heat with a full roof facing the cold north winds. The homestead was bought by Martin Bosworth in the 1860's. In 
the mid 1870's one of his sons, Daniel O. Bosworth, built another home to the east of this location when he 
married. There is a story in the January 6, 1904 issue of the "Bryantville News" telling of its burning. This house 
was located about 400' northeast of the intersection of Route 106, Plymouth St., and Route 105, Thompson St. 





- 

IB 

j i 1 il 




'^w 







• - ' 




? "^ 'jSSfc '* '" *• ■ ' 


% n 





The Drew Place on River Street. This home faced south and its' back was to the road. On 
this farm site once stood the stockade, used by the early settlers. 




The White house was at one time the oldest in 
town but was lost to the elements and a lack of 
love. Located at the corner of Monponsett St. 
and Ocean Ave. 



The Krauss Place stood on the corner of Holmes Street 
and Marjorie Drive. It was disposed of by the Fire 
Department in 1960. 



54. 



OLD HOMES 




■■i 



Residence of G. Steele, Plymouth Street 




Residence of Mrs. J. M. Soule, Plymouth Street 



Jifi EJLfiJ 








UII 

■ 




j..--'.'.j.' ' Hi - MR PVVMJVmiWII — ** 



^^^H 



Melvin Crooker Place, Plymouth Street 




Jared B. Baker Place, Plymouth Street 




Daniel O. Bosworth Place, 1900, Plymouth Street 




Sterling Bricknell Place, Franklin Street 

I 




E. Laurence Grover Place stood on Monponsett Street 
across from Halifax Meadows 



Stephen Lull Place, Plymouth Street 



55 



OLD HOUSES 



* 


)kJt 




1 • 

T* 1 ■ *■ 
1" ft 



GEORGE HAYWARD PLACE — South Street 








■ 11 






DR. MORTON'S HOME - Plymouth St. - early 1850's. 
Was the home of Guy Baker, historian and author of 
History of Halifax. Fence is noted in the national listing of 
historic sites. Photo inset: Dr. Cyrus Morton, 1797-1873. 









■PCS . * '.-a. 






,1I^^VPW 


sfl Br" 










' 


r 1 BhLij^ <&$$* JS^l 




1&£3 


■r " jr - -J IT**' ** > - ,-u- 


■^ mi ^^Sik """P^Pl _ 



SYLVESTER HOMESTEAD — Plymouth Street 
Photo insets: Joseph Sylvester and his wife 



SCOTT LEACH PLACE — corner of River and 
Wood Streets 





V. B. GROVER PLACE — Monponsett Street. This was 
remodeled in 1980 when the condominiums were built. 



LYSANDER HAYWARD PLACE 

Plymouth Street 



56. 







The Otis Pratt place. This later was the home of D. M. Briggs (one time fire chief)- Notice the several "out" buildings. 




Otis Pratt place in the distance, hence the name Pratt Street. 




Located on the left side of Monponsett St. by Palmer Mill 
Rd. is the former home of Rev. James Thomas. Note its' 
"gingerbread" trim which was quite different for its time. 




mill! fciU 




Located next to Jim's Repair is the 
former home of Augustus Hatfield. 



57 




The probate 
record of 
! Oliver Holmes 
of 1864 



PERRY OWNER IN 1900's 




Schedule of Personal Estate. 









J f" 



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f-t 


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7 




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391 N 



58 



■r i n ii. I |i|. ili^lnuii ,in in tin- I'imVuc nffiiv wiidin t'ir.'c iuohUip after lii« »|ii»iin intra. | 

< OMMONM i: Al.TII OF MASSACHUSETTS. 

I'KOIM IK corn I 



\ *'l 



..,1,1 ( mum ••! I'll Ill 



/ (ill)MlM. 

\ i U ..i. I.< i. Ia »p]ioinTt'(l i.i .ippi.iiM-. uii oath, tht- ntUtt' aud tiffa U ol 
C ^< i < I |, lt , , lt rV( /< Vft 



lit! ii|' i (i * < A ft y 

dtii-iiMil, int. .i,,tr, wind! iua/bi >ii mid Commonwealth. 



\'in'ii run ii i" i" i i ■■mi it ill ii - i v i. . . von trill d In ii rlu- oi'drr, -Hid voin doilllfs in piirMi.iiiir thereof, d> 

tin iiliiiiuivii.it / ( i»| the I'statv of said di-vi'asrd, thai he mat 



day of 



H / r,.,i,,tt, {'<»t<i 



(Lei ly t 1| /lL rj f* J 

fk iln - :.. Hi. 1'r .Ii** ( ..mi I'm wid t'tmmy of Plymouth. 

'[iin tin l •" ' f~a~<\.Tc£ it tf / 

(J < , . * / (li» \.-.u of ..hi Kurd one thousand I'ijrlit limidrcd and sixn Av < < 

I',,, .. ' ^^ \ II IMi /' I III \ III. .,!..,> .-ii.iin,-, 1 

-9/- /,.... _^frr • ^i-i ~_ c •'<■- / A >^ ■ /£ . <7is*c^*-, 

r-iiii.,IK a|i|>iMi.-il I in, 'I •iu.li.ili.il lln-i would laillit'ullv I hii|Mrli:ill> iliwlinn;i' llii' Iriwi ■ ,- 1 ». — . t in 

, , •„l,, a 

ii.., rl ./- ^ '/T - ^-' •■-^' 



/!/„ /',, 




I'm ii. ,nl I.. 1 1,. I..i, i; 'i •.,,!.,. - ,l,i, ,,. ,1. ... Hi.iv, apimiisi^l >.,,,] ,-i.,l. lis lull,.., .. I,, »il : — 

A mi ol ' Kiiil K-i.il.-. ..- |i.-r .iliidul.- i-xhiliitcd, - H3-6S, V O 

Vmn I' ,11 lull ,- |.., -, li.-.li il. ■, Alul.it,., I. s '/ 6 r J ■ 1 

' *#*-/* ' ' e 4$>t> 6/< *'<<■ ' 

yi /i.a ' J /C , ^Si. i'*n I 

Pl.lil -- (ticv*_( £7. A. I i I -'^; I'lii-ii pi'i-sonalh .,j>|„'.ir.il 

i.^...-. ft^tu, - idmiimtrakil of said .slat.-. u,„l 

i liM l,. oath that tin- fure^oiii!! i- a Inn *rf\ ;.. -rl. , i luvtiiliirt "I all tin- ••sun. uf said di-ii-asi-ll llml In i, 

da.-. 



1, ,.,.>», 



' ^V^/^ It,, : 



' Schedule of Personal Estate 



IHM.I.H ,T 






s?-l*J- fit* fir 



/(.tAi^. 






tS^-ite- (L<?*M« *&^-*-~~ <^< 
/ /S^u 



$?z 


ft 


4 

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/ 


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Si 


3 


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/ 




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(yrr~f£ ^Zjt^it-^t m-r tsA&r* •Cos. 



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t, 

449 a* 

S~0 ' e 

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/ A t * 
/ 3 3 0> 

its '" 
/ ?X re 

4J0 '" 
gore 

~JTTTTT 



Thompson Street 
Owners 1800's 



1. Simeon Sturtevant -circa 1750 





2. N. Thompson - circa 1740's 







% 


p 


; 


Ji ^Bm 


I g 


Hil 8^ 


liil InlllliiiligJ 



6. M.C. Crocker -circa 1820 





3. Built in 1663 - site of first house in 
Halifax - John Tomson. Rebuilt in 
1677. Taken down in 1838. 




O.^TJ 



7. Mrs. Bryant - circa 1840's 





8. S. Wood - circa 1820 



9. E. Wood - circa 1740 



59 










1 



.o'3fp£ 



t$Er> 



. 



I 






The home of Bradford Waterman, Monponsett Street. This house stood south of the 
Condominium. The man pictured is Bradford Waterman, the father of former Chief of Police 
Howard Waterman. 





N. Thompson house, Plymouth St., across from Bob's 
Garage. This house was later owned by Ed Vaughn who 
at one time was one of the largest property owners in 
town in the early 1900's. 



The home of C.P. Lyon, 1847. It was from this home that 
the call to arms was sounded for the 3rd Massachusetts 
Regiment of 1861. 




The original way to cut your grass. A country scene - 106 South St. 



60. 



I 



-A 







^dl * «*- 



J. Fuller 






73 Wood St. F. Lyons "The Farmhouse" 



395 Plymouth St. 




Polk's Tavern 



243 Franklin St. 



N. Fuller 



117 Fuller St. 





Soule's Rest 



JH'l'MH'^ 



398 Plymouth St. 




V" ^K r Jr 


7, J| 


H^ ' 




1 8 1 





1800's Shoe Factory 



709 Old Plymouth St. 




Otis Thompson 



113 South St. Edmund Churchil 



266 Monponsett St. 



.61 



KINGSTIMBER 




Not all of our old buildings were built on the spots where they now stand. One of the most 
noteworthy examples was not even built in Halifax to begin with. 

In 1930 Miss Alia Libby purchased about 60 acres of Halifax land from A. Richmond Parker. 
When Miss Libby bought the land, only a white summer house and potting shed remained as 
evidence of the thriving "Old Colony" Railroad and nursery and florist business Mr. Parker's 
father had once maintained at that spot. The land fronted on Monponsett Pond and extended 
along both sides of Plymouth Street (Route 106) near the Sturtevant Cemetery. 

It had long been Miss Libby's desire to purchase and restore an old house, but any plans she 
might have entertained in that respect did not include moving a large old building from one piece 
of property to another, let alone from one state to another. Yet that is exactly what came to pass. 

Finding no building in the immediate area to match her desires, Miss Libby traveled to Maine, 
her native state, to look at a house she had learned was to be sold. The building, a one-time tavern 
known as the "Half-Way Tavern," had been built in Brunswick, Maine about 1790 and had 
already acquired an interesting history which Miss Libby soon resolved to increment by 
purchasing the old tavern, dismantling it board by board, and moving it several hundred miles to 
the south. The white summer house was removed from the Halifax land in August 1940. The 
Maine house was purchased and Joseph Everett Chandler, architect, was hired to oversee the 
dismantling and moving of it from Brunswick to Halifax. After seeing to the preparation of 
foundations for Halifax's new-old-house 
almost directly across from the old Sturtevant /> 
Cemetery set well back from Route 106, Mr. 
Chandler proceeded to have the "Half-Way 
Tavern" dismantled, numbering every board, 
beam and hand-made nail, and bring the parts 
to Halifax by train and truck. 

The house was reassembled as it had 
originally stood, with only minor changes 
to make it convenient for 20th century 
living. 




62. 



EARLY BUSINESSES 




Greenhouses of Old Colony Railroad and Nursery 
Established 1845 



013 Oolony ^reen Jfouses 

NICHOLAS FEILEN, Proprietor. 

Florist and Market Gardener 

All kinds of Cut Mowers and Plants in their season. 

PLYMOUTH STREET, near MONPONSETT, HALIFAX, MASS. 




Greenhouses of Old Colony Railroad and Nursery showing 
improvements made. Destroyed by fire in 1890. 




This scene shows the Nursery that stood near the 
road on Plymouth St. across from the Sturtevant 
Cemetery. This is Nicholas Feilen, the manager. 



tt 



IsMfe- 



4h r 

9 B 







White summer house that stood on the site 
about 1935 where the "Kingstimber" now 
stands. It was taken down in 1940. 



63 




In the 1890's 



roofed JVIonponsctfe 



MONPONSETT LAKES, 

HALIFAX, MASS. 



M. SCHINDLER, 

Proprietor. 



In the 1900's 




64. 




In 1886, Moritz Schindler purchased a piece of property on Monponsett Pond and there he built a 
summer home large enough to share with his many friends. As more people began coming to the pond, 
a popular summer resort of the day, Mr. Schindler expanded his home and it became known as the 
Monponsett Inn. It was destroyed by fire in 1895 but was rebuilt as illustrated and continued to serve 
as an inn for visitors who enjoyed the fishing, boating, and swimming that the pond offered. 

After World War II, vacation trends changed and there were fewer visitors to stay at the inn. 
Though the sleeping accommodations were used less, the dining room which could seat as many as 300 
people remained popular and became the most important part of the inn. 

In 1968 fire again destroyed the inn, then owned by the Clairmonts who lost a nine-year-old son in 
the tragic fire. This time the inn was replaced by a smaller facility designed only for dining. It was built 
on the site of the old inn's dance pavilion and the roof peak of the present Sergio's Restaurant is that of 
the original pavilion, all that remains of what was once a large resort hotel on Monponsett Pond. 





Dance Hall, Monponsett in the 1930's 



Today 



65 





■ 



t 






• 




HALIFAX The Ha iif ax Garden Co. 

GARDEN was founded in 1905 by A. 

COMPANY C. Burrage. It consisted of 

a total of 18 greenhouses, 
the largest being 300' X 40' 
with 17 small greenhouses 
equaling a total of 154,000 
square feet of covered 
ground. Roses were the 
major crop of this business with an annual cut of about 2 
million buds a year. These were produced each year with the 
expense of 450,000 gallons of oil. The business closed in 1979. 



ROSES - CARNATIONS 
ORCHIDS-GARDENIAS 



TELEPt [i 
BRYANTV1LLE 



81 




OTTO'S POND 




At a special town meeting December 
29, 1933 a resolution was adopted, 
"that the inhabitants of the Town of 
Halifax highly appreciate the action of 
Mrs. Bertha M. Otto, Mrs. Myrtie B. 
Armstrong, Mrs. Hannah J. Drew and 
Mr. Ernest T. Sturtevant, in granting 
to the town the site of the Local Civil 
Works development." The photo 
here shows the results of this 
donation of land. What is commonly 
known as "Otto's Pond" was built in 
three months in 1934 with $2000 from 
government funds and the work of 20 
unemployed men of the town for use as 
a water hole for the Fire Dept. with 
five acres of land used to build a pond 
and a beautiful park opposite the 
present Fire Station. It was originally a 
small brook rambling through the area 
and the men enlarged and deepened 
the brook so that it covered over a 
quarter acre and the average depth was 
about five feet. The town paid about 
$250 for materials used. 



66 




BROCKTON STORK 



■ KDuotb sitmi. a»Lir»i bibs 




In the 1900's, Arthur Willett was the proprietor of the Brockton Store on 
Plymouth Street which his brother, Watson Willett, operated for him while 
he operated the Boston Store in Monponsett. This building was later 
operated as a "penny candy" store by Harry Minor, Sr., in the early 1940's. 



H»llf»x. Mm. 



Comply with the law 




all »,-!,„ I, , I., tarry > l.jrjltcd I 

If you use 







PA TENT 
LAMP 



for 70 yeorathe world', ttandard, you wit run no .. .i> ..'.,. rett, 
no chance of hub-lii r m < air of accident 

The Neverout it guaranteed to povtwttytay lit. toth,.^ light 
front, tide and rear, uJ the law direct: 
(llluttrotion thowt The Neverout No 44) 
•'■J All »'«/u unJ/.nuncj v} lh< «Ul»*ttJ fi/cverout foi fit h v 

fOR SALE BY 

GEORGE A. ESTES, 

HALIFAX. MASS. 





JUST 

A MINUTE 
STOP AT 

Gus Hatfield's 

Try his Good Things 

Once a customer — 
Always a customer 




This store, next to the library, was built by George A. 
Estes while he operated the old store at the top of the hill 
in 1908. He opened this store Jan. 1, 1909 when the old 
store was closed and moved from its location where the 
present police station driveway is now. In 1927, Harry D. 
Minor, Sr. bought the store and in that year the post 
office was moved from the library to the store with Mr. 
Minor as postmaster. Rufus O. Case bought it in 1941 and 
made the store "self service." Alexander King bought it in 
1951 and ran it until he built King's Plaza by the present 
fire station and opened his new super market in 1957. The 
old store was converted into an apartment building. 



Agustus Hatfield built this store which later became 
Hayward's store and gas station. It grew and changed over the 
years including the addition of the package store. This building 
was removed recently to make room for the complex of stores 
at the intersection of Routes 106 and 58, now Crossroads. 



67 




Located on East Lake was Station #6 for A. R. 
Parker's ice cream and dairy products, whose main 
plant and restaurant was located in East Bridge- 
water. This stand opened in 1925. Arthur 
Richmond Parker came from the "Richmond 
Park" family of Halifax. He started his ice cream 
stand's operation with a single stand at East 
Bridgewater. Later he had 13 stations from Filene's 
in Boston to Provincetown. The small screened 
room to the left is where Ben Thrasher rented boats 
in the summer. The boat house and the bath house 
at this location can still be seen today. 




The Toto family bought the site in 1945 and made 
several changes while leaving the old building in 
tact, including the screened porch and bath 
houses. They operated a Greek restaurant here 
until 1971. 



GtO'Gl W ti'ES 



ESTES 
GARAGE 

REPAIRING and 
• SUPPLIES 

HALIFAX, MASS. 

t.l.Ch.n. Sl-I 




Today this location is known as Lewis'. 
However, the previous owner, Fred 
DesRosier, owned and operated this 
restaurant for 14 years as Kitty's. Many 
additions, changes and alterations were 
made during that time period. 




Fred DesRosier, former owner of Kitty's Restau- 
rant, bought the property and changed the area 
from business to residential. He removed 
everything except the bath houses, which he 
incorporated into his new home as a tool shed. 

George W. Estes built this restaurant and ice cream 
stand in the late 1940's after closing his garage on 
Plymouth Street, which he ran for many years. 
During the summer months, Mr. Estes used to project 
movies on the east end of the building free of charge 
to the public. Cars parked in the open field at that 
time, where the old post office was built later on. He 
sold this building about 10 years later and built his 
home with an ice cream stand attached on Carver 
Street, where Estes' Own Ice Cream recipes were and 
still are being used. 




68. 




Woodcroft Farm, Halifax, Massachusetts 

The Woodcroft Farm was operated in the early 1900's for horticultural and floricultural purposes 
with its numerous buildings and greenhouses. Like everyone else of the time, they also dealt in the 
poultry business. Deacon Waterman was the original owner of the estate. Ed Ramseyer bought it from 
Mr. Waterman. Ramseyer was responsible for the development of Paradise Lane and also the building 
of his new home here at Woodcroft Farm in 1917. Shortly after he built his new home, he sold 
everything to Ralph Atwood. Mr. Atwood lived there until Lawrence Henrich bought the property in 
1961. Mr. Henrich made it his home until he converted the area into the Halifax Country Club in 1967 
and remodeled the home into the clubhouse and offices. 



WOODCROFT FARM, 

HALIFAX, MASS. 



Choice Tomato and Bedding 
Plants in their Season. 



E. C. RAMEYER, 

Prop. 



F. E. CHAFFIN, 

Manager. 




TODAY 



1930's 


















h 


















- 


V 






..« _ 


~~ ^J^fc~& 


J wd 






i ._ i - 


~~"j^B 


RLfc Bl^i^—j ED 


!□ 


0»'l 



' 




THE HOME OF GOOD MILK — J. HOMER TILLSON & SON. HALIFAX 

Parts of this farm yard can still be seen at 305 Plymouth Street 



J. TILSON HOME located between Borhek Insurance and 
Nessralla Farm, burned down early in 1900's. 



.69 




The left side is Farmers Garage; the right is the original blacksmith shop. 



Jared B. Baker came to Halifax 
in 1893 and bought the black- 
smith shop from John Watson 
on what is now Old Plymouth 
Street. It was strictly a black- 
smith shop until the advent of 
the automobile when the old 
and the new were combined 
and it became Farmers Garage 
and Blacksmith Shop. This 
business was ir operation until 
1946. 



J. B. Baker 

Horseshoer, 
Blacksmith 

AND 

Wheelwright 

Carriage Repairing. 
PLYMOUTH STREET, CORNER PINE 

HALIFAX, MASS. 

Ad taken from 1902 Resident 
and Business Directory. 






Ox frame still located in the blacksmith 
shop. This frame believed to have come 
from Middleboro. 




Some of the oxen shod in the frame. 




First commercial gas pump in Halifax. 



Part of the job of the blacksmith was 
being a wheelwright. 



70. 



BUSINESSES 



In 1634 the first Washburn in this country set up a grist 
mill in Duxbury across the bay from Plymouth. In the 
years which followed, the business moved to Huckleberry 
Corner in Carver and then to Middleboro, where it is still 
in operation. 

In 1923 the C. P. Washburn Co. built the Halifax Station 
store. It was called the station store because it was located 
on the site of the Halifax railroad station on Holmes Street, 
where the Halifax Fence Co. is now located. The Station 
Store was the first of five stores that the Washburn Co. was 
to open in the years to follow in Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island and remained in business until 1983. At that time, it 
had been under the ownership of the 11th and 12th 
generation of Washburns, which many believe makes it the 
oldest business in the country to remain in the same family. 
Earl Pauling, manager for many years, was followed by 
Ara Ball, William MacKenzie and the present-day 
manager, Warren Washburn, who had been an employee 
of the company for over forty years, thirty of which have 
been at the Halifax Store. 

Back in the so called "good old days" when the major 
source of income for the Halifax inhabitants came from 
poultry and dairy farming, the store sold forty to fifty tons 
of grain and fertilizer per week under its own brand name, 
"Made Right." Most of it came by railroad from the 
Middleboro store where the feed was processed and mixed. 

In later years, after farming became a less lucrative 
means of income, the Washburn Co. expanded into 
plumbing, hardware and building material. 

In May 1983 the building was sold to the Halifax Fence 
Company. 





C. P. WASHBURN CO. 

MANUFACTURER OF 
MADE-RIGHT POULTRY STOCK AND DAIRY FEEDS 



MIDDLEBORO TEL 107-W OR 8570 
NIGHT IQ7-R OR 203-W 



the folio ■ 



HALIFAX STATION STORK 
BRYANTVILLE 49-6 NIOHT RRV 1.1.2 



'ill be sold (or cash in ton lots at the mill at 



e 
* 

I 



(40 50 Nitrate of Soda (reground) $63 00 

1-8 I 3600 $5900 

Acid Ph. $20.00 Soda (in Exporters' 

We also have a little line of cheaper fertilizers and top dressings if you want 
them, although wc it ive a complete line of chemi- 

Thia it absolutely a high trade material, refround and we will .uarantrr it not 
to lump The analysts you can verify yourself from the Amherst State College 
bulletin. 

If you buy in 'irirer nuantities we will name you a 1 
figured on the lowest point of the market this year They will be higher 

• '• e recommend that you gel your order in now and take I 
the e present prices, This price is figured at the mill at Middleboro, a 
will be made for delivery. If your credit is good you can arrange to buy your goods 
on time 

But Plea,* Remember We Want Your Business. We want to Itf 
make it now as we are not going to sell any fertilizer tl Our 

opinion is that this price will have to be advanced later so get your order in and 
be sure of it. 

M R stands for Made Right and this meant animal tankage, high grade chemi- 
cals, well cured and dried. One freight charge, low overhead and no outside agencies 
gives us a long leeway over competitors on fertiliser, chemicals, land lime, etc. 



These prices are good for week beginning March 3, 1924 



2.18 
1.95 
1.9S 
Oats 1.41 
Re<t Feed Oats 1.30 
Wheat 2.30 

Barley 1-95 

E.1C.E. 



Cunt 
Cr. C 
Meal 
Ilw. Can 



Gluten 

Cottonseed 

Linseed 

liert Pulp 

llran 

Mitl'ls. 

A. Mixed l'-eeil 



2.40 
2.50 
2.50 
2.20 
1.80 
1.80 
2.10 



M. R. Scratch 
M. R. Mash 
M. R. Dairy 
C. Mixed Hay 
68-80% Scraps 
Ceresota Fl. 
Delight P. Fl. 



2.30 
2.85 
2.50 
30.00 
4.60 
1.10 
.95 



C. P. WASHBURN. 




At the turn of the century, Cesare Gentile had a store in Bur- 
rage, Hanson. After W.W.I., about 1920, he closed that store 
and moved to Halifax and opened a store in Monponsett. 




During the winter months, there were 8 families from the 
railroad tracks to the store. The traveling store truck was 
used to serve them and the surrounding area. 



Inside the store with Cesare Sr., Cesare Jr. 
and Mr. Higgins. 




The original store front steps can still be seen here after 
the enlargement of the market through the years. 
Today, most of this building is used as a restaurant. 
The market is gone. 



71 



D. O. Bosworth, 

Milk and Vegetables 

Teaming and Jobbing, 



Tel. Con. 



HALIFAX, MASS. 







•i--vi 




1900's 





A 



1930's 



C. 0. 


BOSWORTH & 


SONS 




Native Pine and Oak 


Lumber 






Farm 


Produce 


in Season 
TRUCKS 1 

l 2- and 3-yar 


: 0R HIRE 

1 capacit) I 




Telephone Bryantville 
I--..- ■ ------------- 


5-12 


H 


alifax, Massach 


usetts 




BOSWORTH'S GARAGE 

GENERAL REPAIRS — WELDING — MOTOR TUNE-UP 

PLYMOUTH STREET, HALIFAX Tel. BRYANTVILLE 53-13 




1942 



72 



CRANBERRY BOGS 




' '- jA-.lfr ., 



Albert C. Burrage Company's steam shovel mounted on a flat car used in the early 
1900's to dig canal and thus control flowage from Monponsett Pond to Stump Pond. 




■■ ' !*•? *■> 





Cranberry Bog Harvest, hand picking with scoop. 



Picking passed to scooping and then to snap machine picking, 
nowadays to the "Floating Method." 



There is some evidence that, in 1867, Ephriam Stetson began to cultivate cranberries in Halifax. In a cove above the 
"Narrows" up Stump Pond way, a narrow out-cropping of berries led Mr. Stetson to begin training cranberry vines to 
run; then he pruned them in a manner to permit easier harvesting. Small pieces of bogs soon sprang into existence 
where moist land could be drained and the turf bottom prepared to carry a medium thickness of sand. Our swamp 
areas lent themselves to this "building" of bogs. 

The big bog movement into cranberry production came when the United Cape Cod Cranberry Co. was organized in 
1904 and Marcus Urann began selling shares in his newly-formed company. He later founded Ocean Spray products. 

The A. C. Burrage Cranberry Co. was founded in 1905. In 
1907, they brought in a very powerful dredge to Stump Pond 
at a point above the narrows, off Elm Street, to dig a 
canal from that point on a direct line along the south side of 
the old pond bottom to the outlet of Monponsett Pond. They 
also developed the Burrage Bogs off the pond side of Elm 
Street, extending beyond the Hanson line. 

Several other pieces of bogs can be found here and there 
throughout Halifax. The upkeep on small patches is, how- 
ever, becoming too expensive and many are being lost to 
the encroaching forest land. Cumberland Farms has bought 
most of this cranberry property. 




** mm 



Truck used in 1920's for bog sanding. 



73 



CUTTING ICE 





Hilda Morton Thomas 



Before electricity came through the area in the 
1920's, it was necessary for everyone to provide 
their own refrigeration. Most families had an ice 
house to store their summer supply of ice. Shown 
in this series of pictures is a wagon load of ice, 
blocks of cut ice, and the sawing of the ice blocks. 



Hilda Morton, Wyman Briggs, James Baker 



Patronize 
your local Iceman. 

Ernold M. Hollis 

HALIFAX 
















\ 


















StfSr x 




*fc 






H^9wf <- -jSKf 


Tt. 


X 






'•■^ , * -k "^^l^iK svtiJgilfeggkaK 




i 






p^HM^B^T. 


i - JflUrJE 


■^umArl 


fig 




?£Vr 




* 







Sturtevant Ice and Oil 





Paul Sturtevant worked on the family Maple Tree Farm 
until the early 40's when he opened his own ice and oil 
business, later adding propane gas. He increased his 



business to seven trucks, six men, and three women in 
the office. In 1978 he sold the business and retired. 



74. 





MAPLE TREE FARM, Plymouth Street 



DRIFTWOOD ON HEMLOCK ISLAND 




luune o^ 

STURTEVANTS /?/ . / , 
turdy (SkickA, 



HALIFAX, MASSACHUSETTS 



TELEPHONE BRYANTVILLE 504 



Halifax was the chicken capital of New England at 
one time. There were several farms throughout the 
area, but Sturtevant Farms was the largest and 
most productive until 1972. George W. Sturtevant 
started farming on Hemlock Island, formerly 
called Driftwood. In 1925 he purchased the Melvin 
Crocker place which he operated as a dairy farm 
for many years with a chick hatchery being added 
in 1941. With the discovery of the Chinese art of 
sexing baby chicks, the chicken business grew and 
by the 1950's, the dairy farm was gone. However, 
with the advent of cross breeding, it was not 
necessary to be an expert to determine the sex of 
the baby chicks, and the business began to 
concentrate on market eggs and fowl. In 1969 sales 
averaged about 500,000 pullet chicks annually. The 
business was a whole family operation with sons, 
daughter, wives, husbands, and grandchildren, 
besides hired hands needed to keep abreast of the 
changing markets through the years. In 1970 
George W. Sturtevant passed away and two years 
later, with increased costs and the decline of 
agricultural profits in the area, the business was 
sold to John Carlton. Today the farm is no longer 
in operation. 






One of many large open chicken ranges 



4-decker laying hen house 



75 



MILLS 



Furnace Street during the 1800's was the busiest and 
most populated part of town. This all started prior to 
1729 when William Sturtevant built a mill. Then by a 
deed dated Jan. 12, 1729/30, an agreement was made 
with Thomas Croade, James Sturtevant, Jacob Chip- 
man, James [Bryant and Issac Thomas, signed by 
William Sturtevant to "Build and erect on my land a 
furnace, cool hse, pot hse, dwelling house with all other 
houses and buildings necessary for the conveniences and 
accommodation of said furnace." 

By 1821 this site was owned by Hobart & Mitchell Co. 
and had grown to include as many as 15 buildings. 

1835 additions were still being made and in 1838 the 

blast furnace was taken down and moved to East 

Bridgewater. The air furnace was taken down and the 

lumber used to build one of the houses on Elm St. 1840 

D&B Morey bought water rights and made woolen 

goods for Hill and Carpenter of Providence, R.I. They 

employed 100 people. In 1848 fire destroyed the woolen mill and boarding house with several other buildings. The 

remaining property was sold to East Bridgewater Gin Works with water rights. In 1850 Elias Carver & Co. owned the 

site. A box manufacturing mill operated there. This was an outlet for Brockton shoe factories. 

The complete businesses were woolen, cotton, long board, shingle and grist mills. In addition, there were a soap 
factory, a shoe factory and blacksmith shop. 




Ye Olde Cotton Mill (built about 1800), Halifax, Mass. 

In 1878 the Bosworth Brothers purchased this box board saw 

mill which operated for thirty-five to forty years. 



HENRY M. BOSWORTH, 

Box Manufacturer. 




WOOD AND LUMBER. 

Wood of all kinds constantly on hand- Wood fitted for the stove 
when desired. All orders promptly attended to. 

Plymouth Street, comer furnace, 

HALIFAX, MASS. 



**r-WA 




Bosworth Bros. Mill. Wagon loads of boxes ready for delivery 
to the shoe factories of the area. 




'rtWViQ 






^MS 




Back of mill showing log yard. 





A. C. Burrage Co. built the tin mill on 
the site of Bosworth's mill after Ye Olde 
Cotton Mill came down. 



WILLIAM H. GUMMOW, 



Teamnig and Jobbing, 

Furniture Moving, 



Furnace near Plymouth St., 
HALIFAX MASS. 




Furnace Street approaching house 
to the right 



Henry M. Bosworth and wife, Furnace 
Street, the former Cushman Place 



76. 



MILLS 




Besides this complex, there were small mills scattered about town such 
as: J. Fuller Box and Shingle Mill on Wood St., E. B. Thompson Saw 
Mill off Thompson St., Palmer Saw Mill on Palmer Mill Rd., William M. 
Tillson Box Boards on Elm St., N. K. Angus Saw and Shingle Mill on 
River St., and Pratt Mill on River St. 



E. H. VAUGHN, 

Dealer In 

Hay, Wood, Lumber, Etc 

Water Saw Mill, Monponset street. 

Residence. Plymouth street. 

HALIFAX. MASS 



WILLIAM C. HAYWARD 

DEALER IN WOOD AND LUMBER 

All orders by mail or otherwise promptly 
attended to. 



FRAIKLIl STREET it Plymploo Line, 



Halifax, Mass. 



Have your 

WOOD SAWED 

By 

Herbert Dewhurst 

Aulo Wood Saw 



SAW MILL. 

SOUTH HALIFAX, - MAS*. 



Halifax Mass., K. F. I). 



Tel. 100 33 



i:„ i.„ , 

I X l.ti»r., 

lliili I...J.-S, 



$2.25 i"i 1000 
$4.00 " " 
$6.00 






* 



wk 





AUSTIN THOMPSON MILL 



WILLIAM M. TILLSON 

Manufacturer of Box Boards 

Wood sawed and delivered in large or small quantities. 

All orders promptly attended to. 

Elm Street, near Pond, HALIFAX. MASS 



IN. K. ANGUS, 

Steam Saw Mill 

Manufacturer ol Box Boards 
Shingle and long Board Mill 

Slab, for Sm\m. 

River Street. He,.. Cm. 

.,.,.,.,...,... . . ... ..... . ,.,.,. ..... . .,,,; 



B. B. Waterman 
TEAMING AND JOBBING 



ALSO DEALER IN 



Charcoal, Wood and Lumber 

All orders promptly attended to. 

Monponsett St., HALIFAX MASS. 





PRATT MILL — Winter 




PALMER MILL 



PRATT MILL — Summer 



,77 



CHARCOAL PITS 




SCHEMATIC CROSS SECTION 
OF CHARCOAL PIT 

Fagan 

Log ladder 

Leaf and dust cover 

Bridgen 

Chimney 

Kindling 

Waist vent 

Foot vent 

Hearth . . . dust ring far side 

Billets and lap-wood 



According to an article by Henry Cobb in the Bryantville News of November 1912, Halifax was 
once the center of a bustling coaling industry which was active in Plymouth County at that time. 
Cobb also mentioned that one Martin Bosworth worked at coaling all through the years, supplying 
large foundries in Boston and in nearby towns. Traces of charcoal pits are still to be found in the 
woods of Halifax. 

Another person who burned charcoal pits was Brad Waterman, father of Halifax's former Chief 
of Police, Howard Waterman. Mr. Waterman remembers helping his father build charcoal pits. The 
following is his description of how to build a Charcoal Pit. 

"Roughly I would say you take a four-foot stick and make a chimney out of it in the middle. Go 
up eight-foot high and pile four-foot sticks up around the bottom endways. Then take another tier 
on top of that endways. Then put a few sticks flat on top of that to kind of grade it off, maybe only 
like about six inches thick laying in over the top of the ends of the second set-up. 

"Cover the top of the chimney with a piece of sod with a few broom-handle holes in it and cover 
the pile over with some hay. Then put sod around it, that you get from wherever you are, and throw 
dirt upon it. Use the sod and the dirt together to kind of set it up. Then you have four, five, or six 
holes, depending on the size of the pit, around the sides and the bottom. You control the way it 
burns by that. 

"Go up on top and build a fire down in that chimney. I don't think he [Brad] ever filled the 
chimney up. He just kept the fire going down in there, but kept it going slow so that it wouldn't all 
start to burn up. The pit must be tended day and night and fed a little wood to keep the Fire going in 
the center. After a certain length of time, I've forgotten just the length of time it took, but it would 
take quite a little while, you'd smother it out when she started to cave down. 

"Then of course, when you started to pull it down, to clear the dirt away and everything, there had 
to be some water around to kill the fire so the charcoal wouldn't burn up." 

The last charcoal pit that was made and burned in Halifax was for the 200th anniversary of 
Halifax in 1934. 



79 



FAIRS 




5econd Annual Fair 

•..-£=j OF t=&— 

Halifax Grange 



DINNER 



AcMt'-s Ticket 



50 cervt-s 



WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 16, 1^07 



PONT FOROET THE DATES 

SEPT. 15 and 16. 



$400 In Premiums In various departments. 

Ferguson's Band of Bridgewater will fur- 

nJsh music 

Sports, Running RaeeJ, Tug-of-W*r, Etc 



Genuine Farmers' Dinner, Thursday 

TICKETS, SO CENTS. 



Grand Ball Thursday Evening In Hall 

TWVtU, UcJuJbtf Svpptr, JISO. Ttrfaui't Ortlulr* 



Everybody Come and See us. 



Bjtju wil mat momlnj; tnlnj tt Hilifix ttitkxv. 
Firt to Grourvij inJ rttym, 25 Cents. 

Admission to Grounds, 25 Cents 

CKlUrtn uivLa I Fru. Fft* » Jmiuloa lo liwt KiH. 



A copy of the ad for the Annual Exhibition 
and Fair — 1909 




In front of the Fire Station 



fa * 



/ 








G. A. Estes & Company 



Virgil Ludden and Miss Lillie Waterman 



80. 




Halifax Grange Fair in parking lot, 1907 



Halifax Fair, 1908 or 1909. Note iron fence around Monument 

■■■IM 




SOCIAL LIFE 




The Halifax Sewing Circle, 1914. It was organized in 1842 as the "Halifax 
Benevolent Society." It had been in continuous existence since that time until 
it disbanded in 1966, although its name changed many times through the 
years. Shown here on an outing to Nantasket, left to right, Mrs. Brown, Lena 
Dewhurst, Carrie Hayward, Abbie Thompson, Nellie Thompson, Ada and 
Esther Bourne, Nettie Bourne, Mrs. H. Ramsdell, Effa Wood, Mrs. 
Newcomb, Grace and Lillian Gummow, Mrs. N.K. Angus, Mrs. Smith 
Wood. 




"Truth on a Holiday," a three act comedy presented by the Plympton- 
Halifax Christian Endeavor on Thursday and Friday evenings, June 26-27, 
1947. Pictured left to right, J. Case, P. Thompson, L. King, R. Case, J. Boyer, 
C. Billings, T. Minott, A. Hayward, R. McAlpine, E. Watson. Note Town 
Hall stage scenery and curtain overhead. 




ANNUAL 




Ladies' Sewing Circle 

Will he iiddotl the 

Town House (.rounds 



HALIFAX. 



Wednesday, July Mh. 



If stormy the nv\t fur rja' 



Ice Cream, lemonade. Confectionery. Finn and Useful and Fine) 
•moles foi Sale 

FIRST-CLASS SUPPER, 20c 

Music by the Middleboro Band 



Admission, IO cts 



)-•>. | IUoi„i„ [•*>* 



This is a copy of the Ladies Sewing Circle 
flyer for their Annual Lawn Party to be held 
on Wednesday, July 26, 1899. 

MONPONSETT PLAYHOUSE 





Early in May, 1945, fourteen girls met ai the home of Mrs. Myra 
Thompson to organize a Girl Scout Troop. Shown left to right, 
Priscilla Thompson, Eleanor Joslin, Mrs. Myra Thompson, 
assistant leader, Lorraine King, Esther Major, Virginia 
Whitman, Dorene Bosworth, Mrs. Elizabeth Joslin, leader, 
Estelle Eidler and Beverly Titus. 



June 1947 cast members of a three act play, "Abigail 
Goes Haywire" presented by Senior Girl Scout Troop at 
Town Hall. Back, left to right, Director and coach Mrs. I. 
Minott, D. Bosworth, P. Thompson, M. Kilroy, E. 
Eidler. Front, E. Major, E. Joslin, T. Minott, L. King. 



83 



*jr(alifaz 

ii <Tarrner s * i^/uo :: 




Season of 7906 ■ 7 



James 7. Thompson, ^President 

~Alrs. 6. ")Y. Jiayivai-d, Secretary ■ • 



.'♦♦^■■♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦ ^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦♦♦ t 



...>m/7Leetinas... 



Nov. 14. At Sylvanus Bourne's 

Choice of Officers and Crop Reports. 



Dec. 5. At W. H. Willett's 

Subject: business methods past and present 
Speaker, G. A. fcstes 

Dec. 19. At H. N. Bosworth's 

Subject:- Most practical manner of exter- 
minating the Gypsy moth. 

Speaker, F.D.Lyon. 



Jan. 2. At J. P. Thompson's 

Subject:- How can the farmer best protect 
himself against fire. 

Speaker, J. P. Thompson 



Jan. 16. At Lester W. Bourne's 

Subject;- Iu what way is our town growing 
Speaker, G. W. Hayward 



Jan. 30. At George A. Estes' 

Sabject:- Alfalfa, its use and value; is it 
advisable to grow it. 

Speaker, Frank Cbaffin 



Feb. 13. At W. C. Hayward's 
Ladies uighi. 



Feb. 27. At Frank D. LyoL's 
Question box. 



Mar. 13. At G. W. Havward's 

Subject:- The secret of saving. 

Speaker, James T. Thomas 



Mar. 27. At Frank ChafSn's 

Subject:- Farm leaks and how to mend 
them. Labor savers in the house. 

Speaker, Watson H. Willett 



Apr. 10. At James T. Thomas' 

Subject:- What is the greatest foe farmers 
have to contend with. 



Apr. 24. At Orri'.le C. Cole's 

Subject:- What crops to raise and how to 
raise them. 

Speakers, All members of the club. 



£^ 




Members of the Halifax Farmers' 
Club. 1st row, Nellie Thompson, 
Mrs. Peck, Edgar Peck, Nettie 
Bourne. 2nd row, Archer Nicker- 
son, Edith Newcomb, Gertrude 
Nickerson, Nettie Thomas, Lucy 
Harlow, Mrs. Gilbert Miller. 3rd 
row, Mrs. Elwood Buck, Ernest 
Newcomb, Mrs. Ralph Fish, Anna 
Parker, Myra Rogers. 4th row, 
Anna Devitt, Peck's daughter, 
Mrs. Ludlow, Elwood Buck. 5th 
row, Louise Lane, Eleanor Wright. 
6th row, Mona Currier, a friend of 
the Chadburns, John Chadburn, 
Mrs. Edith Chadburn, Doris 
Hoinghaus, George Parker, Arlene 
Sturtevant (Kenison now). 7th 
row, Gilbert Miller, Ralph Fish, 
Richard Sturtevant, Elmer Wright, 
Harold Lane, Richard Currier. 
(Mrs. Arlene (Sturtevant) Kenison 
enjoys the honor of being the 
person with the longest member- 
ship at the present time.) 



1876 — HALIFAX FARMERS' CLUB — 1984 

The minutes of the first meeting March 10, 1876 inform us that all attending agreed to become members of a 
club to be known as the Halifax Farmers' Club organized for the 'purpose of mutual improvement and the 
promotion of agriculture.' Ephraim B. Thompson was elected President with Van Buren Grover, Vice 
President, Nathaniel Morton, Secretary, and Josiah S. Pope, Treasurer. And so it began and continues in this 
108th year of its organization and the 250th Anniversary of the Incorporation of the Town. It is appropriate 
that we pause in our activities and wish the Town a Happy Birthday!!! 



84 



At each of the early meetings, members volunteered to speak on assigned subjects, such as, "What is more 
profitable to raise, fresh or English hay?", "How shall we make farming pay?", "What is the best time to top 
dress meadow lands?", and "What is the best method of cutting and curing grass?" 

To add variety to the meetings, in addition to ample suppers and assigned subjects, the piano and 
graphophone became commonplace, readings and declamations were presented, public information sessions 
were scheduled, visitations with area Farmers' Clubs were organized and Farmers' Festivals held. 

The First Annual Fair and Old Home Day was sponsored by the Halifax Grange and the Halifax Farmers' 
Club on Wednesday, September 26, 1906. The agenda included, among other items, fancy plowing, team 
pulling, harnessing contest (won by a lady), greased pole, judging in a variety of categories (cattle to fancy 
work), and a windmill whittling contest by boys under 14 years of age. An attendance record, still standing, 
was set on February 1, 1912 with seventy-one present at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jabez P. Thompson. 

Through the years the Club extended its community-centered interests with Agricultural Scholarships, 
funds for 4-H activities, gifts for the Community Christmas Tree, participation in the celebration of the 200th 
Anniversary of the Town, and sponsorship of the first Scout Troop. 

In 1976 the Club celebrated its 100th Birthday with a gala meeting designed to commemorate the century- 
long history of the Club. 

The 1980's find us involved with planning our part in the 1984 Town Birthday Party commemorating the 
250th Anniversary of the Incorporation of the Town of Halifax. In addition, we continue our happy practice 
of serving ample suppers, being entertained and educated and sharing pleasant evenings together. 

While it is true that not many of us are farmers in the sense that our predecessors were, the first stated 
purpose of organization, that of 'mutual improvement,' continues. A spirit of congeniality and friendship, of 
loyalty and helpfulness abounds and makes our meetings purposeful. Guests remark of the friendly and 
informal atmosphere and express their pleasure of meeting with us. 

The Halifax Farmers' Club encourages and welcomes new members. It is our hope that others will become 
interested in becoming members as we begin to make tentative plans for our 150th Anniversary on March 10, 
2026. 




r $S 
U 



o 






r^ 






] 



) • 



i 






9 



, 




MEMBERS OF THE HALIFAX FARMERS' CLUB. Front row, Kim Bosworth, Mildred Brown, Roger Bosworth, Zillah 
Bryant, Harriet Newcomb, Raymond Newcomb, Dorene Kiernan, Albert Kiernan, Olive Baker, James Baker, Howard Waterman. 
2nd row, Henry Bosworth, Guy Baker, Gladys Burroughs, William Perkins, Ruth Perkins, Jeannette Bosworth, C. Otis Bosworth, 
Dorothy Briggs, Wyman Bnggs. 3rd row, Anne Forsstrom, Raymond Forrstrom, Florence Hayward, Rachel Waterman, Harold 
Lane, Louise Lane, Donald Randall. 4th row, Harry Brown, Hilda Thomas, Hazel Briggs, Basil Warren, Esther Warren, Isabel 
Randall. In front, guest Charles Bosworth. 



,85 




A men's Drill Team of the Halifax Grange P. of H. #253 about 1910 shown 
seated on the stage of the upper Town Hall auditorium before this area was 
converted to office space. All the men dressed in women's clothing would put 
on skits for their own Grange or visit surrounding Granges. Back row, H. 
Dewhurst, G.A. Estes, H. Tillson, St. Claire Prime, A. Nichols, C. 
Dewhurst, F. Simpson, N. Guptill, C. Devitt, W. Wood. Front, unknown, 
A. Wood, A. Dewhurst. 




Drama presented by members of the Grange, 1934. 
Back, left to right, C. Devitt, M. Schindler, Z. 
Baker, D. Bosworth, C. Bosworth. Front, J. 
Baker, E. Dutton. 




During their 50 plus years of organization, the Grange performed and gave 
to many home and community service causes. One of these was the giving 
and planting of a Christmas tree in front of the Town Hall in the 30's. Shown 
here are, Jared Baker, Maude Nicol holding niece Janice Nicol, Charles 
Nicol, Hilda Watson, Harry Brown, Mae Dutton, William Ladd, Rev. 
Warren Leonard and Edwin Dutton. 




The Halifax Grange;P. of H. #253 was founded in Halifax on Dec. 27, 1905 
and met for 56 years on the 1st and 3rd Tuesday of each month. With the 
decline of agriculture in the area, their membership dropped and in 1968 
their charter was ended. Pictured above in 1947 are front, Virginia Whitman, 
Esther Major, Patricia Schindler, Mary J. Schindler, Josephine E. Ladd, 
Susie Minor, Maude Nicol, Dorothy G. Bosworth. Back, Virginia Sheldon, 
Hilda Watson, Dorothy Lane, Harry Cone, Charles T. Nicol, James Case, 
Rufus Case, William H. Ladd, Thora Harris, Nettie Thomas, Marion 
Stoddard. 



THE WATSON PRESS 

THOMPSON STREET, HALIFAX, MASS. 



TELEPHONE BRYANTV1LLE 30S-4 



BILLHEADS 

LETTERHEADS 

ENVELOPES 

TICKETS 

PROGRAMS 



POSTAL CARDS 
FOLDERS 
OFFICE FORMS 
BOOKLETS 
BUSINESS CARDS 



SAVE TIME! SEE YOUR LOCAL PRINTER! 



Also responsible for many photos in this book. 




Myrtle Estes gave one of her first piano recitals in 
Brockton under the tutorship of Mr. Shaul in June, 
1898. The following year, 1899, she was one of 4 
students to graduate from Halifax High School. 
"Myrtie" (Estes) Armstrong, the daugher of 
George A. Estes who ran the Central Store, 
married and settled in town. For more than 75 
years Myrtie gave of her talent at the piano for 
every meeting, play, talent show, minstrel show, 
choir, dance orchestra, etc., while raising her own 
family. She loved children and in 1964 was 
awarded a Certificate of Recognition for services 
rendered as pianist for the Junior Choir. She 
always had a ready smile and a thank you was all 
she needed to have her continue playing for any 
audience. 



86, 




Baseball has been a popular pastime in Town for 
many years. The Mayflower League was organized in 
1920. Shown here are the 1923 champions. Front, P. 
Willette, A. Heinonen; 2nd row, A. Braddock, L. 
Billings, C. Devitt, J. Baker, E. Hayward; back, H. 
Ramsdell, G. Baker, L. Mantyla. 




Behind the Central School in the 1920's — shows the 
popularity of the winning Halifax Town Team. 




Town Team in the 30's — Front, H. Deming, A. 
Braddock; 2nd, J. Deming, N. Braddock, J. Aubert, E. 
Braddock; back, R. Trop, H. Mitchell, A. Thomas, J. 
Rigo, J. Bouldry. 




In the 40's the Town Team continued to have full 
support with younger brothers and sons now on the 
team here behind the Central School. 





Action at home game — Vaughn Memorial Field 



Top of the 8th, away game. 



87 




1942 "Hunting Group" home from Maine. This group and others went 
hunting annually for more than 25 years. From 1 to r: back, George 
Sturtevant, Milford Dennett. Front, Manny Benevedis, Pat Willette, Deke 
Bricknell, Ray Dodge, Lawson Billings, Ed Hayward, Alan Braddock, Tiff 
Braddock, George Sayce, Ralph Hayward, Jr., Russell Sturtevant, Ralph 
Hayward, Sr. 





The Canal Project of 1909 included this group of 
surveyors working in Halifax on a proposed canal to go 
from Monponsett Pond at 11th Ave. and follow the 
brook by Indian Path to the Fire Station, to swampland 
across South Halifax to Tomson Mill Pond on 
Thompson St., by way of the Winnetuxet River, and 
hence to the Taunton River and the ocean. 

Clarence Devitt and wife in sulky. 



The Gentile children and friends: 1 to r, Albrico, Phil, 
Manual Monteiro, Steven Croghan, Leo, Polibio, Sonny 
and Cesare, Jr. 

A memorable event around 1910 was this procession of 
circus elephants that performed at Grover's Corner (the 
four corners at the intersection of Routes 106 and 58). 





tik 



88. 



BI-CENTENNIAL 



With the vote of Annual Town Meeting in 193 1 the following people were appointed by the then Town 
Moderator, James W. H. Baker, to serve on the 1934 Bi-Centennial: Jabez P. Thompson, Clarence E. 
Devitt, Jared B. Baker, Mrs. Ella F. Baker, Mrs. Austin Thompson, Helen Thompson, Clyde O. 
Bosworth, Mrs. Florence Hayward, David M. Briggs, Charles Donati, Mrs. Mary J. Schindler, Mrs. 
Gladys M. Burroughs, James T. Thomas, G. Harry Armstrong, Mrs. Florence B. Barnes, Nathaniel S. 
Guptill, George L. Schirmer, E. Lawrence Grover, Mrs. Mildred Grover, Gilbert C. Thompson, George 
A. Estes, Zillah A. Baker, Roland H. Minott, Ralph B. Atwood, Mrs. Marian P. Tillson. 

The 200th Anniversary Celebration of the incorporation of the Town of Halifax in 1934 began on 
Sunday, July 1, 1934 with special services in the Congregational Church at 10:30 a.m. and again at 3:00 
p.m. with a large number of people attending from other towns, quite a number of them coming from long 
distances. The morning service was under the direction of the pastor, Rev. Warren Leonard. The principal 
service of the day was at 3 in the afternoon, when the edifice was filled to overflowing. After the 
auditorium was filled, chairs were brought in, and still there were many who had to stand during the 
service. The sermon was "Youth of To-day and Church of To-morrow," by Rev. Scott C. Siegle of 
Westminster, a former pastor of the church. 

On Tuesday evening, July 3rd, the Halifax Grange held an open meeting with the public invited. About 
200 people were present and were welcomed by Charles Nicol, Master of the Grange, who in turn 
presented John Renshaw, Master of the Juvenile Grange. A fine program was presented consisting of 
solos and duets, addresses by invited guests, an original poem by George A. Estes who had recently 
observed his 79th birthday and had been the second Master of the Grange some 23 years earlier, and a 
historic paper was read by president of the Historical Society, C. Morton Packard, that had been written 
50 years previous by Ephraim B. Thompson about historical reflections of Lieut. John Thompson. It told 
about the famous Tomson gun, which is 7 ft. 4'/2 in. long, with the barrel itself being 6V2 ft. long and 
weighing 20 lbs. 12 oz. It also told about the first Tomson house built in Halifax and how after it was 
rebuilt, it was again torn down in 1828 with the only part left being the old door-stone which the plaque is 
attached to today. Also mention was made of an apple tree on the farm which was 140 years old then in 
1934 that had yielded 36 bushels of apples that year. 

Wednesday. July 4th, was the big day of celebration and it began at 6 o'clock, sunrise, with the bell on 
the Congregaiional Church being rung to usher in the nation's birthday as well as the 200th anniversary of 
the incorporation of the Town of Halifax and the little old town was filled with the folks from this and all 
surrounding towns as well as a large number of the sons and daughters of the town who had moved to 
other places and had returned to meet old friends and make new ones. There were also people here from as 
far away as Halifax, England. 





Chief of Police Charles Donati 



Maurice Robbins' ox team and an unidentified boy waiting for the parade to begin. 



,89 



1934 




One of the features of the parade was a number of older 
forms of transportation. Shown here is a four-horse hitch 
stage coach. 




Halifax Grange float with from 1. to r.: Dorothy 
Holzworth, Elizabeth Armstrong, Louise Titus and 
Dorene Bosworth. An old school bus converted into a 
truck was used for this float. 



At 10:15 a.m. a baseball game started at the 
Vaughn Memorial field behind the Central School 
between the Halifax Town Team and a team from 
Rock village, which resulted in a score of 7 to 5 in 
favor of the Halifax team. 

At 11:15 a.m. a tablet was unveiled on the site of 
the first John Tomson house, the first home in 
Halifax. This house was destroyed by the Indians 
in the Indian War of 1675. The four young 
children of William and Bertha (Thompson) 
Crosby participated in the unveiling of this tablet 
placed on the original hearthstone of John 
Tomson's first home. 

At 12:00 noon a tablet was unveiled at White's 
Island commemorating the capture of the Indian 
Wamsutta. The inscription on the tablet read: 
"Near this spot Wamsutta was taken prisoner by 
Maj. Josia Winslow, an incident said to have 
precipitated King Philip's war. Placed by the 
Halifax Historical Society." 



Shortly after 10:00 a.m. a parade through the 
center of town began. First in line was Chief of 
Police Charles Donati on his motorcycle, 
followed by members of the Board of Selectmen 
in automobiles. Among the features of the parade 
was an ox team, an old stage, a replica of the ship, 
Mayflower drawn by four horses, a 
Congregational Church float, and decorated 
floats of the Halifax Grange, a float from Laurel 
Lawn Farm of J. Homer Tillson which carried 
two beautiful dairy cows, Ralph Sturtevant 
dressed as an old-time preacher and carrying a 
large ancient Bible rode a big jet black horse, the 
Halifax Gardens showed a beautiful display of 
their roses. There were several autos decorated in 
streamers and one of the latest things in new 
autos. 




The Congregational Church float depiction of the 
first organized Sunday School in America in 
Halifax. Left to right: Nathaniel Guptill, Edwin 
Dutton, an unidentified boy, Kathleen Watson, an 
unidentified boy, David King, Mary Hayward, 
Allan Hayward. 




Float with George A. Estes seated in chair, and 
others unidentified. 



90. 





Tomson Stone — Jabez Thompson 
and grandchildren. Left to right, 
Thompson, Elizabeth, William and 
John Crosby 



Unveiling of tablet at White's Island by Misses Marilyn and 
Marjorie Benson, twin daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Benson, 
and speaker Elroy S. Thompson. 




A musical selection was given by the Hanson Girl Scouts Bugle and Drum Corps. An address was 
given by Elroy S. Thompson, the first President of the Halifax Historical Society, who spoke briefly of 
the event that took place on this spot. The presentation to the town was by C. Morton Packard and the 
acceptance was by Jabez Thompson. 

Both of these tablets were gifts of the Halifax Historical Society. The Society was also instrumental in 
placing 15 temporary wooden markers in different locations throughout the town. Some of the sites had 
considerable history connected with them; others were less well known because the people who could 
tell their stories were deceased. 

The 1st marker, beginning at the easterly end of the town, was on the site of the Sturtevant house. The 
first Samuel Sturtevant lived and died in Plymouth, but he bought about 400 acres in the Majors 
Purchase and settled his son, Samuel, on it. Samuel built the first grist mill in town. The 2nd site marked 
was that of the first schoolhouse at the corner of Plymouth and Holmes Streets, near the house formerly 
occupied by the George Bliss family. It is not definitely known when it was built, but there was a 
schoolhouse there until about fifty years before 1934, when it was moved to Grover's Corner. The 3rd 
site marked was the East Cemetery, the oldest in town. The original deed is dated June 27, 1728 from 
Samuel and Josiah Sturtevant to alot of people and recorded June 28, 1728. Andrew Richmond sold it 
to the town of Halifax on November 30, 1868 and for some unknown reason, it was not recorded until 
March 10, 1908. There is an open space on the easterly side where there are no gravestones. No one 
really knows why it is there, but there are supposed to be unmarked graves. 



The 4th site marked on Plymouth Street was that of the Richmond parsonage. Rev. Abel Richmond, 
who served the church from 1800 to 1832 lived there. It was then owned by William Bunker. Going 
along to the center of the town were several markers. The 5th site was Dunbar's Tavern. This was a 
large, two-story gambrel roofed building built by the elder Daniel Dunbar for his son, Daniel, possibly 
as early as 1700. Many stirring scenes took place there as the Dunbar's were Tories and the younger 
Daniel was driven out of town. This building was bought and torn down by J. Levering Jones more than 
80 years ago. The 6th site was the first meeting house built by the proprietors in 1733 and deeded to the 
town in 1752. In 1854, this same building was sold by the church to the town, together with a strip of 
land, and was used solely for town purposes — a new building having been erected for a church in 1852. 
Across the street was the 7th site, the house known as Pope's Tavern, built by Stafford Sturtevant for his 
son-in-law, Captain Henry Pope. It must have been built prior to October, 1830 because it was in this 
tavern that the convention was held on October 13, 1830 that sent John Quincy Adams to the 23rd 
Congress in Washington, D.C. 

Going down the hill was the 8th site of Bosworth's Tavern where George A. Estes lived. Ignatius 
Thompson referred to this place as having been built in the very early days by Deacon David Bosworth 
and afterwards kept as a tavern by his grandson, John. According to the late James T. Thomas, this 
building was burned about 125 years ago. The 9th site marked on Plymouth Street was that of the 
Universalist Church which was built in 1828 and dedicated on January 1, 1829. There is an interesting 
story connected with this church. Darius Cobb, the noted artist, used to preach there when he was a 
young man, and his twin brother, Sylvanus, preached on alternate Sundays. They looked so much alike, 
the congregation couldn't distinguish them. This society was rather short lived and the building was sold 
and was moved and used as a barn on the Kate Mitchell place. The 10th site was the old cotton mill built 
by the Mowry's of East Bridgewater about 1800. This later became known as Bosworth's mill; the 
Bosworth brothers, Henry and Daniel, owned it and for 27 years carried on a box board business. When 
Henry was a young man, a company from Bridgewater put in a box board machine, the first one ever 
made. The 1 1th site was on South Street at what is believed to be the first muster field. The 12th marker 
was placed on the site of the old "Trunk Meeting House" on Fuller Street. This church got its name 
from the shape of the original church whose ceiling was said to have been rounded like the lid of a trunk. 
This church was of the Baptist denomination. The first society is said to have been organized in 1821 
and reorganized as a branch of the Central Baptist Church of Middleboro in 1835. The 13th marker was 
placed near the site of the Drew place on River Street and stated that about thirty rods south of that spot 
stood the original stockade. The 14th site marked was Thompson's mill owned by the proprietors, one 
of whom was Zadock Thompson, who inherited the famous long gun. This gun was sold by his 
grandson to Mr. Johnson of the Iver Johnson Co. and is now in the care of the Taunton Historical 
Society. And the 15th marker was placed on Monponsett Street to mark what was known as Palmer 
Mill. This mill was owned by eleven proprietors, one of whom was Samuel Palmer; some of the others 
were John Sturtevant, Sr., Jabez Soule, and for many years by Edwin H. Vaughan. Mr. Vaughan was 
the owner when the mill was struck by lightning and burned in 1919. 

At 1:00 p.m. a dinner was served by a 
well known caterer in a large dining 
tent that had blown down the previous 
evening during a violent thunder and 
lightning storm. This picture shows the 
large gathering on the Hall green for 
the festivities. 



Shown on the following page is the 
site of the afternoon programme which 
began at 2:15 p.m. with a band concert 
by the Middleboro High School Band. 
The address of welcome was given by 
E. Laurence Grovtr, chairman of the 
bi-centennial committee, followed by 
the invocation by Rev. Francis Houston 




92 



*k 




J§~ 



*# . 





of Monponsett Church, with songs sung by 
William Gammons, greetings from the parent 
town of Middleboro, a historical address by Rev. 
Paul Sturtevant Howe, whose father was the fifth 
pastor of the church from 1832 to 1835 and whose 
mother was a native of Halifax. Shown here is a 
view of the Town Hall green by the driveway with 
the seating arrangements and the outdoor stage 
used by the speakers during the day. The stage 
was surrounded by evergreen trees and blended 
very naturally with the rest of the area. Note how 
few maple trees were there. 

Some distance from the rear of the Town Hall 
was an exhibit of the making of charcoal by 
Austin Bourne who had been a charcoal burner 
for more than eighteen years. The charcoal pile 
contained 14 cords of hard wood piled closely 
together, covered with green hay and on top of 
that was about 5 inches of sand. The pile had to 
burn for two weeks before it was done, and at this 
time had been burning for one week. Mr. Bourne 
expected to get 500 to 600 bushels of charcoal 
from it. 

A log cabin replica of the first house in town 
served as a registration booth throughout the 
day where everyone attending the programs of 
the day was asked to register, as all records of the 
events of the celebration were to be sealed and not 
opened until 100 years from that date, 2034. 
However, at this time it is not known what 
happened to them. Perhaps someone who reads 
this will be able to shed some light on this matter. 

The Congregational Church was open all day 
until 9:00 p.m. with exhibits and photos on 
display. In the lower Town Hall several old-time 
industries were carried on with Mrs. Carrie 

Hayward braiding rugs, Mrs. Anderson of Pembroke spun wool and flax, and the Ladies Sewing Circle 
tied a quilt. Also on display was the old Tomson gun (closely guarded all day), Indian relics and wooden 
ware. Outside was a very ancient ox shoeing frame used by Jared J. Baker. A 3-inch cannon ball found 
in the vicinity of the old foundry was presented to the Historical Society. 

A very modern touch was given to the afternoon program when Raymond Newcomb flew over the 
Town Hall grounds and circled several times in his airplane. Throughout the day, little Puritan girls 
dressed in gray with white caps and kerchiefs acted as ushers. They were Myrtle Churchill, Joyce Sands, 
Virginia Thomas, Adeline and Alma Baker, Isabelle King, Marjorie Angus, Mary Hayward, Edith 
Robinson, Elizabeth Monroe, Elizabeth Armstrong, Mary Renshaw and Catherine Mitchell. 

At 7:15 p.m. a pageant was presented written by Mrs. Isabell Nason, a former native of Halifax. It was 
entitled, "Halifax 1734-1934.'" The outdoor stage, shown on next page, was built on the Town Hall lawn 
and was banked with evergreen trees on three sides. This gave a very pleasing effect for the pageant in 
which a large number of townspeople participated, portraying the various historic episodes pertaining 
to the life of the town through the past 200 years and more. The first scene opened with the green corn 
dance by the Native Indians. Those portraying the characters of Indians included: Mrs. King, Mrs. 




93 




PAGEANT PLAYERS — Left to right, front row, Cesare Gentile, Albert Thomas and David Briggs. Second row, Mrs. Christina 
Guptil, Mrs. Grace Wood, Mrs. Gladys Burroughs, Miss Geneva Rogers, Mrs. Etta Briggs, Mrs. Dorothy Willis Briggs, Miss 
Edith Robinson, Mrs. Susan Leavitt, Mrs. Frances Packard, Mrs. Eleanor Packard, Miss Virginia Thomas, Mrs. Hilda Thomas, 
and Mrs. Annie Robertson. Rear row, Elroy Sherman Thompson, N. S. Guptil, Mahlon Leonard, William McKay, F. W. 
Oeffinger, George Thomas, Laurence Grover, E. H. Leavitt, C. S. Packard, W. A. Leonard and James Robertson. In front of rear 
row, three boys of pageant. 



Joseph Renshaw, Mrs. F. Hayward, Isabelle King, Mary Hayward, Albert Grover, Arthur Boyd, George 
Thomas, and William McKay. 

Scene two portrayed the first family of Halifax in their home, with the following characters: Mr. and 
Mrs. John Thompson, Sr., taken by Miss Helen Thompson and Laurence Grover; young Mr. and Mrs. 
John Thompson, taken by Mr. and Mrs. Irving Minott and two children. This episode depicted the 
Indians entering the Thompson home and frightening the family, upon which Mrs. Thompson seized a 
stout oak-handled broom and drove them away. They returned later and set fire to the dwelling. 

Episode three showed the call for the first town meeting by a letter signed by J. Quincy to assemble at 
the home of Samuel Sturtevant on July 18, 1734. The part of the clerk, Ignatius Cushing, was taken by 
Wyman Briggs; Selectmen — David Bosworth by Clyde Bosworth, Ebenezer Fuller by Lester Bourne; 
and another part taken by Frank Oeffinger. 

Episode four was the church incorporation period. On October 13, 1734, eleven women and eight men 
took letters from the Middleborough church to join the religious society in Halifax and founded the 
church, with Rev. John Cotton, grandson of the famous Rev. John Cotton of Boston, as the first 
minister. Those taking part in this episode were Mr. and Mrs. Wyman Briggs, Mr. and Mrs. Lester 

Bourne, Mrs. David Briggs, Mrs. Earl Wood and son 
Ellsworth, and the part of Rev. Cotton was taken by Rev. 
Warren Leonard. 

The part of the Tory in the next episode was taken by 
Nathaniel Guptil. The Tory was run out of town for refusing to 
take sides with the townspeople. Others in the cast included 
Continental soldiers: Mr. Briggs, Richard, Robert and 
Theodore Grover. The graceful minuet was then danced by the 
following young people: Mr. and Mrs. Herman Galbraith, Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Benson, Miss Muriel Otto, Mrs. Stanley Tillson, 
Richard and Ralph Sturtevant. 




94. 



The next episode was the War of 1812, depicting Captain Asa Thompson who was known as the "tall 
captain" because he was 6' 6" tall, with Adnah Harlow of Middleboro taking the part. It is interesting to 
note that this company was chartered by John Hancock who was the first governor of Massachusetts 
after the Revolution. Others taking part in this episode were Mahlon Leonard, Joseph Renshaw and 
Henry Bosworth. In this episode they were sent to guard the Gurnet, and later transferred to Boston 
harbor. The Civil War period was next portrayed by the same company which also fought in the Civil 
War. There were 101 men who went from Halifax, this being seven more than were asked for. Twenty- 
four never returned. 

The next episode featured the Lancers' quadrille with the well-known old-time fiddler Thomas Flynn 
of Plympton, who called off the numbers as he played. Two sets were formed and those taking part were 
Mr. and Mrs. George Bliss, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Dutton, Mr. and Mrs. William Robertson, Mr. and 
Mrs. Edward Leavitt, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Higgins, Mr. and Mrs. William Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. C. 
Morton Packard, and Mrs. and Mrs. Charles Packard. 

The Spanish-American War was represented by Comrade Wood and Rev. Paul Sturtevant Howe, 
who was one of the principal speakers of the afternoon. Next came the World War and at this time there 
was community singing of "Smiles," "Long, Long Trail," and "Pack Up Your Troubles." The flag was 
carried by Albert Thomas. Others participating included Frank Minott, Guy Baker, Edwin Hayward, 
Cesare Gentile, Frank Purpura, Louis Stevens and J. Logan, all veterans of World War I. 

A pleasing march and flag drill was presented by pupils of Miss Margaret Conneally with the 
following taking part: Helen Ferry, Helen Woodbury, Isabel King, Myrtle Churchill, Ruth Estes, 
Stephania Onulak, Marjorie Angus, Elizabeth Munroe, Frederick and Leonard Krappe, Raymond 
Brown, Robert Woodbury, Robert Holzworth, John Renshaw, Henry Bosworth and Frank Radford. At 
the close of the pageant all of the characters grouped on the stage and united in singing, "America." 

In the evening, a dance was held in which every other number was an old time dance with music 
furnished by an orchestra under the direction of Walter Milne and assisted by Thomas Flynn of 
Plympton and his old-time fiddle. 

It was estimated that between two and three thousand people participated in the 200th birthday 
anniversary. Everything went off smoothly, and there was nothing to mar the day from start to finish. 
The schedule went on time and everyone did his alloted part cheerfully. The memory of the day has long 
been cherished by townspeople and visitors alike. 

An interesting report from the Treasurer of the Bi-Centennial Committee was in the Town Report in 
1934. As we plan now for the Town's 250th anniversary and begin to plan costs of today for our 
celebration in 1984, the following copy of the financial report in 1934 is a real eye opener to our ever- 
rising costs of today: 



REPORT OF TREASURER OF BICENTENNIAL 
COMMITTEE 



PAYMENTS 

Mrs. C. F. Tewksbury, Secretary. 

Postage 
J. E. Watson, Printing stationery 
J. E. Watson, Printing programs 
J. E. Watson, Printing dinner 

tickets 
Austin F. Bourne, Labor, coal pit 
George Stone, Labor, coal pit 
Halifax Grange, Soloist and 

accompanist 
Thomas Flynn, Violinist 
T. Morton Packard, Cash paid foi 

sign 
Wolf, Fording Co., Costume and 

make up material 
W. W. Gammons, Soloist 
Thomas F. Holman. Dinner 
Thomas F. Holman, Rent of three 

tents 
Warren Hall, Quartette 
Evaline Peirce, Bugle and Drum 

Corps 
Taunton Lumber Co., Lumber and 

nails 
Carl F. Otto, Professional Services 
Stearns Cushing, Band 





James Edgar Co., Materials 


42.11 




Luther Churchill. Soloist 


8.00 




Charles Packard, Entertaining 




$20.75 


speaker 


8.00 


25.00 


Peter Bouley, Trucking and 




60.50 


cleaning up 


12.00 




Emil Bouley, Labor 


4.00 


5.90 


Mason Dean, Microphone 


5.00 


63.50 


E. L. Grover, Cash paid for small 




45.00 


wares 


2.96 




C F. Benson, Four horse team 


15.00 


15.00 


Maurice Robbins, Oxen 


5.00 


6.00. 


Edwin Hayward, Labor 


7.20 




Joseph Renshaw, Labor 


3.60 


1.75 


Everett Wood, Labor 
Plympton Grange, Repairs on 


3.60 


5.63 


tables 


10.00 



15.00 
262.50 

50.00 
20.00 

10.00 

45.31 

8.00 

50.00 



RECEIPTS 



J. P. Thompson. Treasurer 
Sale of dinner tickets 

Appropriation 
Overdrawn 



$659.31 
183.00 

$500.00 
159.31 



$842.31 



$842.31 




A view of the Town Hall grounds from 
the upper windows. 



Respectfully submitted, 

N. S. GUPTILL. 



95 



INDEX 

Acknowledgements 1 

Bicentennial (1934) 89-95 

Businesses 63-79 

Cemeteries 34-35 

Census, 1790 6-7 

Churches 24-26 

Depots, Railroad 45 

Fairs 80-82 

Fire Department 42-43 

Houses, Old 54-62 

Incorporation 4-5 

Introduction 2 

Library, Holmes Public 47 

Lindbergh 41 

Maps 9-13 

Police Department 44 

Post Offices 46 

Preface 3 

Rivers and Scenes 14-23 

Schools 48-53 

Social Life 83-88 

Town, Center of 27-33 

Voting Lists 1818 8 

Wars -. 36-40 



HARRY B. HARDING & SON, INC. 

7 Marble Street, Whitman, Massachusetts 02382 



96